Research

Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications
Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’ conditions and make...
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research
When it comes to green living, nobody does it better than plants. When plants convert light into fuel through photosynthesis, not a single particle of light is wasted. If we could unlock plants’ secrets, we might be able to perfect the design of light harvesting in solar cells. Gregory Scholes, Princeton’s William S. Tod Professor of Chemistry,...
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
The growing use of artificial intelligence in both everyday life and life-altering decisions brings up complex questions of fairness, privacy and accountability. Surrendering human authority to machines raises concerns for many people. At the same time, AI technologies have the potential to help society move beyond human biases and make better use...
Monday, Jan 7, 2019
by Wendy Plump for the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies
Princeton University undergraduate students demonstrate a new level of commitment to environmental conservation as they serve in research, volunteer and internship positions around the world. Determined to be guided by local nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and mentors, these students dive into projects directed by grassroots groups, trusting...
Monday, Jan 7, 2019
by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research
Leah Boustan, professor of economics, uses digitized historical records and other sources to give researchers a statistical footing for studies on immigration, past and present. Boustan’s work is part of a growing trend in economics toward harnessing large data sets to explain historical observations.
Monday, Jan 7, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
Princeton graduate students in the lab of Peter Jaffe have been examining soil samples from a tributary of the Neuse River in North Carolina as part of a project investing nutrient cycling and pollution in the wake of Hurricane Florence, which dumped more than 20 inches of the rain there last September. Back in the lab at Princeton, the...
Thursday, Jan 3, 2019
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Outside Eve Ostriker’s office door stretches the universe, dotted with orange galaxies against the black backdrop of space. The mural lines the hallway in Princeton’s astrophysical sciences building, where it inspires Ostriker to explore what lies beyond our own galaxy, the Milky Way. How did those far-flung galaxies grow and evolve? “It is the...
Wednesday, Jan 2, 2019
by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research
Artificial intelligence is already a part of everyday life. It helps us answer questions like “Is this email spam?” It identifies friends in online photographs, selects news stories based on our politics and helps us deposit checks via our phones — if all somewhat imperfectly. But these applications are just the beginning. Through advances in...
Wednesday, Jan 2, 2019
by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research
Thomas Conlan fiddled with a strange, brownish-black rock on his desk. For centuries, people had considered the piece of rubble worthless, but it is priceless to Conlan’s research. The lumpy rock is a sample of slag, the material left over after heating ore to extract valuable metals. With researchers from art, engineering and materials science,...

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