Campus News

Thursday, Apr 19, 2018
by Sarah M. Binder, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
A reception and video tribute April 18 in Robertson Hall at Princeton University commemorated the legacy of economist Sir W. Arthur Lewis and the renaming of the building’s main auditorium in his honor. Lewis served on Princeton’s faculty from 1963 to 1983 and was the University’s first black full professor. He received the 1979 Nobel Prize in economic sciences and remained associated with the University in emeritus status until his death in 1991.
Wednesday, Apr 18, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber on Wednesday, April 18, joined other presidents and chancellors whose institutions are represented by the Association of American Universities in endorsing a statement affirming the value of free speech on campus.
Tuesday, Apr 17, 2018
by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Princeton alumni Allan Jabri, Samuel Kim and Yessica Martinez — all of the Class of 2015 — have been awarded the Paul & Daisy Soros Fellowships for New Americans, a graduate school fellowship for outstanding immigrants and children of immigrants in the United States. The Princeton fellows are among 30 who were selected from 1,766 applicants for their potential to make significant contributions to U.S. society, culture or academic work. They will receive up to $90,000 for graduate study in the United States.
Monday, Apr 16, 2018
by Benjamin Ball, The Daily Princetonian
A team of computer science majors and entrepreneurs from the University are the winners of the TigerLaunch competition, the nation’s largest student-run entrepreneurship competition. The team of Felix Madutsa ’18, Avthar Sewrathan ’18, and Richard Adjei ’18 are the founders of the company BlockX, whose primary product is Afari, a decentralized social network meant to protect users’ data and information and maintain privacy by using technology called blockchain.
Monday, Apr 16, 2018
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
“Poverty in America,” an undergraduate course at Princeton, is examining the central aspects of poverty, spanning joblessness, housing and neighborhoods, crime and punishment, and survival and protest. The class is co-led by sociologists and poverty experts Matthew Desmond and Kathryn Edin.
Monday, Apr 16, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
The trustees of Princeton University have adopted the University’s operating budget for 2018-19, which includes a 7.7 percent increase to $174.2 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is affordable for every admitted student.
Friday, Apr 13, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
United States Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey has been selected to deliver the keynote address at the University’s Class Day ceremony on Monday, June 4. “Sen. Cory Booker leads a life of incredible public service,” said Class Day Co-chair Miranda Rosen. “A strong advocate for bipartisanship, Sen. Booker consistently serves his constituents and the nation with integrity, honesty and strength. Sen. Booker greatly embodies Princeton’s motto, ‘in the Nation’s Service and the Service of Humanity,’ and I am thrilled he is our Class Day speaker.”
Thursday, Apr 12, 2018
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Your chemistry grades don’t define your future in medicine. Good doctors aren’t made by good science grades alone, says Kate Fukawa-Connelly, director of Princeton’s Health Professions Advising office. Nor are doctors defined by their family backgrounds, how high they scored on standardized tests or their college majors. “A lot of people assume there is only one type of person or one route to becoming a doctor,” Fukawa-Connelly said. “That is wrong. The health care system needs many different people with diverse talents and experiences.”
Tuesday, Apr 10, 2018
by Benjamin Ball, The Daily Princetonian
An elite team of computer science majors from the University are taking their project to the finals of TigerLaunch, the nation’s largest student-run entrepreneurship competition. Their company’s mission is to help people reclaim their privacy and data on the internet using blockchain technology.
Monday, Apr 9, 2018
by Pooja Makhijani, Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies
Princeton University seniors Lavinia Liang, Katie Tyler and Erika Ward have been awarded the Henry Richardson Labouisse ’26 Prize to pursue international civic engagement projects for one year following graduation.
Friday, Apr 6, 2018
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton junior Nicolette D’Angelo has been awarded a Beinecke Scholarship, which supports promising students in their graduate studies in the arts, humanities and social sciences. D’Angelo, who is from Hewitt, New Jersey, is a classics major who is pursuing certificates in gender and sexuality studies, humanistic studies and creative writing (poetry). She plans to pursue a Ph.D. in classics and a career in academia.
Thursday, Apr 5, 2018
by Salem Solomon, Voice of America, Africa Division
Asad Hussein was born in Dadaab, one of the world’s largest refugee camps, in 1996. His parents and older sister had fled the war in Somalia five years earlier in search of a new life. Dadaab was meant to be temporary, but it became home. Now, he’s preparing for a new journey after being accepted by one of the world’s most prestigious universities. The 22-year-old refugee plans to join the class of 2022 at Princeton University.
Thursday, Apr 5, 2018
by Gwen McNamara, Pace Center for Civic Engagement
Over spring break, more than 100 Princeton students explored critical social issues such as immigration, land use and gun violence in communities across the U.S. and on campus through Breakout Princeton and Breakout Local with the Pace Center for Civic Engagement.
Monday, Apr 2, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton and 30 other colleges and universities filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the U.S. Supreme Court on Friday, March 30, in support of the State of Hawaii’s challenge to a Trump administration proclamation on immigration.
Thursday, Mar 29, 2018
by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications
Princeton graduate student Colin Defant and 2014 alumna and NJ native Dina Sharon are two of 10 recipients this year of Hertz Fellowships. They were selected from nearly 700 applicants interested in pursuing graduate work in chemistry, electrical engineering, computer science, mathematics or physics. The fellows will receive a stipend and full tuition support valued at more than $250,000 for up to five years of graduate study.
Thursday, Mar 29, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton University has offered admission to 1,941 students, or 5.5 percent of the record 35,370 applicants for the Class of 2022, in what is the University’s most selective admission process to date. Last year, the University’s admission rate was 6.1 percent. The class size is expected to be 1,296 students for the Class of 2022....largest representation from New Jersey and 17 percent will be the first in their families to attend college.
Thursday, Mar 29, 2018
by President Eisgruber, Princeton University
Princeton’s efforts to increase socioeconomic diversity and enable students from all backgrounds to thrive on our campus address four key steps along the pathway to, through, and beyond the University. First, we have improved outreach to prospective low-income students...
Tuesday, Mar 20, 2018
by Sarah Binder, Woodrow Wilson School
An essay by Kishan Bhatt ’17 MPA ’21 has been selected as one of the top 100 global submissions for the 30th edition of the St. Gallen Wings of Excellence Award. As a result of this honor, Bhatt will attend the 48th St. Gallen Symposium in St. Gallen, Switzerland, in early May, where the top five essay-writers (to be selected in April) will present their ideas on stage. The theme of this year’s event is “Beyond the End of Work.” In his essay, “Public Service in an A.I.-Driven World,” Bhatt presented a vision for what will be required of public service in a world shaped by artificial intelligence, including how technological literacy and a commitment to fairness are critical for government leaders of the future.
Friday, Mar 16, 2018
by Ethan Sternfeld '20, Princeton Alumni Weekly
As Congress debated the future of immigration reform and the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program last month, PAW sat down with three of the 15 DACA recipients, also known as Dreamers, who are enrolled at Princeton.
Thursday, Mar 8, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
In a letter sent Thursday to U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson and Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber expressed “deep concerns” over changes the departments are considering on immigration rules.
Thursday, Mar 8, 2018
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
While propaganda is hardly a new tactic of war, technology has made it easier, faster and more effective. Defending America’s democracy from the dissemination of fake news and disinformation through traditional and social media is a top concern for today’s policymakers. A daylong conference, “Defending Democracy: Civil and Military Responses to Weaponized Information,” on Saturday, April 7, at Princeton University, will examine disinformation and the widespread digital dispersion of propaganda. This conference is open to the public, registration is required.
Thursday, Mar 8, 2018
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Since Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico last September, the commonwealth has struggled to return to normalcy, and since that time, Princeton faculty, staff and students have found ways large and small to help.
Thursday, Mar 8, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber joined 48 other college and university presidents in signing a letter urging leaders in Congress to repeal or amend a tax on endowment earnings included in a tax bill that President Trump signed into law. The college and university presidents highlighted how the tax threatens the ability of Princeton and other institutions to use their endowments to support increased affordable access to their institutions while maintaining their commitments to world-class teaching and research.
Tuesday, Mar 6, 2018
by Barbara Valenza, Princeton University Library
Former U.S. Sen. Bill Bradley has donated his papers to the Princeton University Library. The extensive collection documents the remarkable career of the former congressman, professional basketball player and 1965 Princeton alumnus.
Tuesday, Feb 27, 2018
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber joined Princeton town officials Monday, Feb. 26, for a wide-ranging discussion on topics of joint interest, including the University’s Campus Plan, town-gown partnerships, the innovation ecosystem, immigration and sustainability.
Monday, Feb 26, 2018
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Veteran television journalist Charles Gibson and author and critic Daniel Mendelsohn reflected on modern challenges to fundamental democratic values in speeches during Princeton’s annual Alumni Day.
Monday, Feb 26, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
On Saturday, Feb. 10, some 800 students from 48 high school teams across nine states — as far as Washington and Florida — arrived on campus to compete in the second annual Princeton University Science Olympiad Invitational Tournament.
Friday, Feb 23, 2018
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
As Princeton and its peer schools have increased the number of first-generation and low-income (FGLI) students, resources and staff dedicated to these students also have grown. The FGLI Consortium, which formed last year, is a national organization that provides leadership and expertise to administrators working with students who are low-income and/or the first in their families to attend college.
Monday, Feb 19, 2018
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton University seniors Adam Berman and Kaamya Varagur have been awarded Gates Cambridge Scholarships. The awards give outstanding students from outside the United Kingdom the opportunity to pursue postgraduate study at the University of Cambridge. The program was established in 2000 by a donation from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to Cambridge to build a global network of future leaders committed to improving the lives of others.
Tuesday, Feb 13, 2018
by Gwen McNamara, Pace Center for Civic Engagement
Month of Service provided the opportunity for Princeton University faculty, staff, students and alumni to participate in service with a wide range of community organizations in New Jersey, including: the Pace Center’s Community House program; Habitat for Humanity of Burlington County and Greater Trenton-Princeton; HomeFront; Mercer Street Friends; Princeton Nursery School; Trenton Area Soup Kitchen; and the Trenton Digital Initiative.
Monday, Feb 12, 2018
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton University seniors Isaac Treves and Natalie Tung have been awarded fellowships from ReachOut 56-81-06, an alumni-funded effort that supports year-long public service projects after graduation. Each student will receive a stipend of $30,000 to pay for living expenses during their fellowship year. Treves will use his fellowship for AtentaMente, a Mexico City-based nonprofit. Tung will use her fellowship for HomeWorks Trenton.
Friday, Feb 9, 2018
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Danny José Navarette, a member of the Class of 2019 and a first-generation student at Princeton, is majoring in ecology and evolutionary biology and is also pursuing a certificate in Latin American studies. He applied to Princeton through the QuestBridge College Match Program, a nonprofit that links high-achieving, low-income students with partner universities.
Friday, Feb 9, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber sent a letter to members of Congress on Thursday, Feb. 8, urging them to pass legislation that would provide legal status for immigrants from El Salvador, Haiti, Nicaragua and Sudan living in the United States under Temporary Protected Status (TPS).
Thursday, Feb 8, 2018
by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
President Christopher L. Eisgruber has selected “Speak Freely: Why Universities Must Defend Free Speech” by Princeton politics professor Keith Whittington as the book for this year’s Pre-read.
Friday, Feb 2, 2018
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
The student group Natives at Princeton, which includes all indigenous peoples, builds community and educates through events on campus. The group’s scope was widened to include indigenous people from places including North, Central and South America. Said Toledo, who belongs to the Diné tribe (more commonly known as the Navajo), “We are all native to somewhere.”
Tuesday, Jan 30, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
President Christopher L. Eisgruber and five Princeton faculty members participated in and led discussions on global issues at the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, last week.
Monday, Jan 29, 2018
by Julie Clack and Danielle Alio, Office of Communications
Before coming to Princeton, Jordan Thomas received lots of advice, but the words that stuck with him most were, “Never forget where you came from.” Nearly four years later, the senior has found multiple ways to connect with his Portuguese and Newark, New Jersey, roots, both in and outside the classroom. Thomas is concentrating in the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs and earning certificates in African American studies and Portuguese language and culture, on his way to being named a Rhodes Scholar last November and graduating this spring.
Friday, Jan 26, 2018
by The Office of Communications
Several Princeton University departments and programs and over 30 Princeton-area nonprofit organizations will investigate the theme of “Migrations” from February through May. Programming will include lectures, exhibitions, film screenings, author talks, performances and more. The “Migrations” community initiative website includes programming details and will be updated throughout the spring as events are added.
Thursday, Jan 25, 2018
by Nick Donnoli, Office of Communications
If you step into a dining hall any day on Princeton’s campus, you’re presented with a vast array of cuisines from around the world. Though portions are carefully calculated, some food goes untouched at the end of meal periods. While Campus Dining has had a composting initiative for 20 years as part of its sustainability efforts, there was a communal feeling that the food could go toward a better cause.
Wednesday, Jan 24, 2018
by Sarah Binder, Woodrow Wilson School
Ten students at Princeton University, among them three from New Jersey, have been selected to the 2018 cohort of the Scholars in the Nation’s Service Initiative (SINSI). Established in 2006, SINSI is designed to encourage, support and prepare the nation’s top students to pursue careers in the U.S. federal government, in both international and domestic agencies. Through rigorous academic training integrated with work experience, the goal of the highly competitive scholarship program is to provide students with the language and workplace skills needed to succeed in the public policy arena.
Monday, Jan 22, 2018
by Emily Aronson and Danielle Alio, Office of Communications
Born in Venezuela, Ana Patricia Esqueda moved to the United States in the fifth grade, speaking little English. She is now a junior at Princeton, the first in her family to attend college. Esqueda grew up in Trenton, New Jersey, with her mom and extended family of aunts, uncles and cousins. She first visited campus during high school as a member the Princeton University Preparatory Program. PUPP is a free college prep program for high-achieving, low-income students who live in the Princeton area. Esqueda credits PUPP with inspiring her to consider selective universities, as well as helping her with college and financial aid applications.
Friday, Jan 12, 2018
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton University will join with community organizations on Monday, Jan. 15, to support the Arts Council of Princeton’s annual day-long series of events to observe Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The free program, which will be held from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the council’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, includes live music, interactive workshops and discussions relating to King’s life, teachings and civic engagement.
Friday, Jan 12, 2018
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
The presidents of Princeton University and Microsoft Corp. on Thursday urged members of Congress to act quickly to provide long-term protection, including a path to citizenship, for “Dreamers.”
Wednesday, Jan 10, 2018
by Environmental Health and Safety
In response to a call for donations, the Princeton University Office of Environmental Health & Safety is donating personal protective equipment to hard-hit Puerto Rico. Princeton’s role in donating needed supplies was initiated by Shaundree Davis, senior program manager for industrial hygiene, after hearing of the request from Region II of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) during a recent meeting of the New Jersey Chapter of the American Society of Safety Engineers. Knowing Princeton had excess medical gloves in storage—set aside for pandemic relief but nearing the end of their shelf-life—Robin Izzo, director of EHS, saw an excellent opportunity to help with hurricane relief efforts.
Thursday, Dec 21, 2017
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton University’s Holiday Bake-Off brought the tastes and spirit of the season to the Frist Campus Center on Dec. 13, raising $679 for the United Way of Greater Mercer County’s Community Impact Fund.
Friday, Dec 15, 2017
On Saturday, youngsters and their parents gathered at McDonnell Hall at Princeton University to learn about the science of chocolate, courtesy of professors Howard Stone, chair of the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and Bonnie Bassler, chair of the Department of Molecular Biology.
Wednesday, Dec 13, 2017
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber and 28 other college and university presidents and chancellors have joined a new Presidents’ Alliance on Higher Education and Immigration as founding members.
Monday, Dec 11, 2017
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton seniors Hans Hanley and NJ native Jennifer Silver of Cherry Hill and University of Oxford graduate student Samuel Barnett have been named recipients of the Daniel M. Sachs Class of 1960 Graduating Scholarship, one of Princeton University’s highest awards.
Wednesday, Dec 6, 2017
by Denise Valenti, Office of Communications
Princeton seniors Rebecca Singer and Michael Shin, and alumni Shefali Jain, a NJ native, and Joseph Tobin, have been named Schwarzman Scholars. The Schwarzman Scholarship covers the cost of graduate study and living toward a one-year master’s program at Tsinghua University in Beijing.
Tuesday, Dec 5, 2017
by The Office of Communications
Princeton University has issued a planning framework to guide campus development over the next 10 years in the context of potential needs and developments over the next 30 years.
Tuesday, Nov 28, 2017
by The Office of Communications
Princeton alumnus Eduardo Bhatia-Gautier, minority leader and former president of the Senate of Puerto Rico, has been selected as the speaker for the University’s 2018 Baccalaureate ceremony.
Tuesday, Nov 21, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
During Princeton University’s fall break, a cohort of undergraduates met with leaders of think tanks, philanthropies and elected officials to cultivate their capacity for citizenship and leadership on campus and to prepare them for service and success in a global society.
Tuesday, Nov 21, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The Princeton and Slavery Symposium, held Nov. 16-19 at Princeton University, featured panels, performances, guided tours, exhibitions, film screenings and a keynote speech by Nobel laureate Toni Morrison. Hundreds of people attended the events: Princeton students, faculty and staff members; scholars and higher education administrators from across the country; and community members. Thousands watched the proceedings through livestreaming.
Monday, Nov 20, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton University senior and New Jersey native, Jordan Thomas, has been awarded a Rhodes Scholarship for graduate study at the University of Oxford. He is among the 32 American recipients of the prestigious fellowships, which fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford.
Monday, Nov 20, 2017
by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Princeton University dedicated the naming of Morrison Hall on Friday, Nov. 17, in honor of Toni Morrison, the Robert F. Goheen Professor in the Humanities, Emeritus, and the recipient of the 1993 Nobel Prize in Literature. Morrison was the first African American to be awarded the prize.
Friday, Nov 17, 2017
by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications
On Oct. 27, more than 900 area students visited Frick Chemistry Laboratory for the 2017 National Chemistry Week “Chemistry Rocks!” Activities Night. Children and young people ages 5 and up were invited to don safety goggles and get their hands dirty with hands-on activities, games and presentations related to the chemistry of Earth. They learned about rock-forming minerals, made slime and limestone caves, watched coal form, investigated ocean chemistry, dug for fossils, and more.
Thursday, Nov 16, 2017
by Gwen McNamara, Pace Center for Civic Engagement
Over fall break, 70 Princeton students took part in service projects through the Pace Center’s Breakout Princeton and Breakout Local programs. Teams of students worked with the Trenton Area Soup Kitchen and HomeFront through Princeton Local, or went to New York City, Boston, Baltimore and Philadelphia on student-designed trips focused on a variety of social issues.
Tuesday, Nov 14, 2017
by Nina Sheridan, Class of 2019
During a conference Nov. 10-11 at Princeton University, scholars, students, poets and fans from across the country celebrated the life and legacy of Langston Hughes to mark the 50th anniversary of his death.
Thursday, Nov 9, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The Princeton and Slavery Project is creating opportunities for Princeton students and community members to explore the project's findings through arts classes, newly commissioned plays and an art installation.
Thursday, Nov 9, 2017
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
Most of the work in developing artistic skill happens behind the scenes, alone in a practice room or with a teacher in a teaching studio. But Princeton University offers students and the community another chance to learn by inviting well-known professional performers and artists to become teachers in a communal setting, through a variety of master class offerings on campus.
Monday, Nov 6, 2017
by Gwen McNamara, PACE Center, Communications Coordinator
As the co-founder and executive director of HomeWorks, a nonprofit organization that provides an afterschool boarding program to underserved middle and high school girls in Trenton, NJ, Natalie Tung, a Princeton University senior, is making an impact on campus and in the community. An impact that has earned her the A. James Fisher, Jr. Memorial Prize – an honor awarded annually by the Pace Center for Civic Engagement to a Princeton senior who demonstrates an entrepreneurial spirit; exudes a zest for life; enthusiastically builds community at Princeton; mentors and promotes their peers; and is committed to Princeton and its mission of service.
Monday, Nov 6, 2017
by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Princeton University will present its top honors for alumni to veteran television journalist Charles Gibson, and author and critic Daniel Mendelsohn.
Monday, Nov 6, 2017
by The Office of Communications
Princeton University, one of its students and Microsoft have mounted a legal challenge to the federal government’s termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program as announced on September 5, 2017. The complaint, filed on November 3 in federal court in Washington, D.C., alleges that DACA’s termination violated both the United States Constitution and federal law.
Monday, Nov 6, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
That a slave sale took place on campus in 1766 and the first nine Princeton presidents were slaveholders at some point in their lives are two of the major findings from a sweeping new endeavor by Princeton scholars and students to explore the ties of early University trustees, presidents, faculty and students to the institution of slavery.
Wednesday, Nov 1, 2017
by Princeton Athletics
The Princeton rowing teams have been active with the New Jersey Special Olympics since 2013, and the partnership they have built together has created opportunities and memories for everyone involved. Men’s heavyweight rowing coach Greg Hughes helped launch the partnership, and students are now leading the program. While staff at the Special Olympics envisioned their athletes working on machines in the boathouse, many now train on Princeton’s Lake Carnegie.
Tuesday, Oct 24, 2017
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton University has reinstated a transfer admission process for undergraduate students, and transfer applications will start to be reviewed in the spring for entry in fall 2018. The program looks to enroll a small group of exceptionally well-prepared transfer students from a range of backgrounds. It is part of the University’s concerted efforts to increase diversity in the student body.
Tuesday, Oct 24, 2017
by Ushma Patel, Office of Communications
Students come to Princeton University from all over the United States and the world, from the Jersey Shore to Ecuador. The views and experiences they bring with them are a large part of what makes the campus an intellectually and socially dynamic environment.
Monday, Oct 23, 2017
by Office of Communications, Princeton University
Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber has sent a letter to two Princeton alumni who hold leadership positions at Amazon.com to describe “some of the synergies that might benefit Amazon if you were to join us in the state that we are proud to call home.” Amazon recently issued a Request for Proposal for a second corporate headquarters in North America, and several areas in New Jersey have expressed interest in submitting proposals. Amazon’s current headquarters is in Seattle, Washington.
Wednesday, Oct 18, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Anne Case, the Alexander Stewart 1886 Professor of Economics and Public Affairs, Emeritus, at Princeton University, was elected a member of the National Academy of Medicine (NAM). She is among 70 regular members and 10 international members announced Oct. 16 at the academy’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C.
Thursday, Oct 5, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
Two departments have the responsibility of keeping Princeton University and the town of Princeton safe and secure — the Princeton Police Department and Princeton’s Department of Public Safety. The departments have had an ongoing and evolving partnership since Paul Ominsky, executive director of public safety, arrived at the University in 2010. The collaboration aims to provide the best possible emergency response and policing to communities — both on campus and off.
Thursday, Oct 5, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The Lewis Arts complex features buildings that work both independently and synergistically; an underground Forum that promotes collaboration, community and connectivity; and myriad architectural details that reflect and promote the artistic process.
Wednesday, Oct 4, 2017
by Liz Fuller-Wright, Office of Communications
Kip Thorne, a Princeton Graduate School alumnus, is one of three recipients of the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics. Thorne joins Rainer Weiss and Barry Barish in winning the prize “for decisive contributions to the LIGO detector and the observation of gravitational waves.” In announcing the award, the Royal Swedish Academy called the direct measurement of the ripples in spacetime, predicted by Albert Einstein a century ago but never before directly observed, “a discovery that shook the world.”
Monday, Oct 2, 2017
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
In June, Princeton graduate student Andrew Or and Nico Toy of the Class of 2018 traveled to the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens, New York, with music lecturers Margaret Kampmeier and Jennifer Tao to select the last of 48 new pianos that have been purchased for the University’s new Lewis Arts complex.
Thursday, Sep 28, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
Municipalities around the country are working to limit climate change and prepare for its consequences. For the town of Princeton, planning is a priority. As the town reevaluates its progress on climate positive activities, it has collaborated with five Princeton undergraduates as part of the University’s Tiger Challenge to help them address a vexing problem — how to increase residents’, businesses’ and town stakeholders’ engagement in the creation and implementation of a new plan that has greater impact.
Tuesday, Sep 19, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton has again joined 30 other colleges and universities in submitting a friend-of-the-court brief challenging the Trump administration’s ban on entry into the United States by people from six Muslim-majority countries. On Monday, Sept. 18, Princeton and the other schools filed an amicus curiae brief with the U.S. Supreme Court. The court is scheduled on Oct. 10 to hear oral arguments in the matter, which stems from the Trump administration’s revised order in March to block citizens of Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the United States.
Monday, Sep 18, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
John McPhee, a Ferris Professor of Journalism in Residence, reflects on his writing process, what he learns from students and the creative nonfiction course he has taught at Princeton for 40 years. His 32nd book, “Draft No. 4,” was published Sept. 5. From his office in the fifth floor tower of Guyot Hall, home of the Department of Geosciences, John McPhee can look down through two vertical windows and see the office in McCosh Health Center where his father served as a medical doctor for Princeton University Athletics from 1928 until the late 1960s. McPhee, a Ferris Professor of Journalism in Residence, was born and raised in Princeton and attended elementary school at 185 Nassau St., now the home of Princeton’s Program in Visual Arts. A 1953 alumnus, he has taught writing at Princeton since 1975: his course, “Creative Nonfiction” (originally called “Literature of Fact”), offered each spring, is open to Princeton sophomores, by application, and limited to 16 students. To date, nearly 450 students have taken the course.
Friday, Sep 15, 2017
by Aaron Nathans, School of Engineering and Applied Science
Thirty-seven Princeton University students spent the summer working at young businesses in New York City this summer at the Keller Center's summer internship program in New York, the Princeton Start-Up Immersion Program. They fanned across the city, working at 19 startups, and came together for meals and panel discussions. In this video, they discuss what they did this summer, and how it will matter for their careers.
Friday, Sep 15, 2017
by Isabel Cleff '18, Princeton University
Members of the Princeton Rocketry Club participated in the 2017 CanSat competition, in which student teams design, build and launch rockets and payloads to meet contest goals that vary each year. Princeton’s team, the Flying Tigers, traveled to Stephenville Texas for the June 10 launch. The annual CanSat competition is sponsored by the American Astronautical Society and the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. When our team’s seniors were first years at Princeton, several of us took a seminar on the science and history of spaceflight, which culminated in designing a lunar rover. Though we were all excited by the material, we realized at the end that we hadn’t actually touched any hardware - leaving a big gap in our education. Six of us set out to change that, and Princeton Rocketry Club was born. Though we spent our first year mostly building model rockets in our dorm rooms, the club took off and grew into an incredible organization. In the past year, we’ve worked on high-power rocketry, space balloons, and the CanSat project, which I had the awesome opportunity to lead this year.
Friday, Sep 15, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts and Department of Music will celebrate the opening of the new Lewis Arts complex with a Festival of the Arts Oct. 5 through 8, open to the public. The festival will feature over 100 concerts, plays, readings, dance performances, art exhibitions, multidisciplinary presentations, film screenings, community workshops, performances by student arts groups and site-specific events at venues across the campus, most of which will be free.
Monday, Sep 11, 2017
by Jeanne Jackson DeVoe, Princeton Plasma Physics Lab
For Dhruvit Patel, a rising senior majoring in mechanical engineering and physics at Rutgers University, the 10 weeks he spent at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) were a welcome opportunity to do hands-on research. Patel was one of 21 students in the Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internships (SULI) program to take part in an Aug. 16 poster session at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) PPPL. Also taking part in the poster session were Community College Internship (CCI) program students, engineering interns, and high school interns, bringing the total number of participants to 32.
Monday, Sep 11, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton University President Christopher L. Eisgruber sent the following letter Friday, Sept. 8, to the Republican chair and the ranking Democrat on the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
Monday, Sep 11, 2017
by Karin Dienst, Office of Communications
Princeton University celebrated the accomplishments of its students with the awarding of four undergraduate prizes at Opening Exercises on Sunday, Sept. 10. “We are proud of these prize-winning students and delighted to celebrate their academic success,” Dean of the College Jill Dolan said. “They have worked diligently at their studies, while demonstrating how to best take advantage of the many opportunities Princeton offers its undergraduate students. For instance, they belong to clubs, hold internships and conduct service work, study abroad, and excel in artistic practices — all in addition to maintaining high grade point averages. They are an inspiration to our community. I’m pleased to mark their accomplishments with these distinguished awards.”
Friday, Sep 8, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
Orientation at Princeton University includes more than a week of activities to welcome the 1,315 first-year students of the Class of 2021. Students work together and quickly form friendships through small-group experiences in community service projects, outdoor adventures and campus workshops. 600 of these first-year students at Princeton University participated in Community Action this week at more than 120 sites in Princeton and other communities in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. Founded 30 years ago, Community Action facilitates the transition to college by introducing first-year students to the values, expectations and resources of the inclusive Princeton community.
Wednesday, Sep 6, 2017
by Office of Communications
A new work by the internationally acclaimed artist Maya Lin has been commissioned for the grounds adjacent to the new Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University. Princeton University’s installation will provide a landmark for visitors to campus and an invigorated outdoor setting for students to stage ad hoc performances and enjoy plein air classes. Additional details about the commission will be announced later in September.
Tuesday, Sep 5, 2017
by Office of Communications
President Christopher L. Eisgruber sent a letter to congressional leaders Tuesday urging them to place the highest priority on legislation that would provide immediate and long-term protection for young people enrolled in or eligible for the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, commonly known as DACA.
Thursday, Aug 31, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber sent a letter to the White House on Wednesday urging U.S. President Donald Trump to continue the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in its current form and to defend the policy from any potential court challenges.
Monday, Aug 28, 2017
by Susan Promislo, Office of Communications
Summer on campus routinely buzzes with young people who come to Princeton to become a stronger student, researcher, athlete or performer. Summer 2017 stood out for the variety of programs the University hosted to help low-income and nontraditional students access college in the first place, and succeed once they’re admitted.
Monday, Aug 28, 2017
by Vayne Ong and Katherine Powell, Class of 2020
Every summer since 2002, SJP has brought a cohort of outstanding rising seniors from diverse backgrounds onto campus for 10 days of rigorous learning, writing and reporting. After the program, students are paired with SJP counselors, who serve as advisers throughout the college admissions process. This year, the program brought together its biggest class yet — 39 students — all from first-generation and low-income backgrounds.
Thursday, Aug 17, 2017
by Danielle Alio & Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
At age 18, Yusuf Dahl wasn’t heading off to college. He was on his way to prison. Even on the day of his sentencing, though, Dahl was thinking ahead to how he could use his time in prison to prepare for a successful life on the outside. Eventually, he built a career and became involved in addressing the foreclosure crisis in his Milwaukee neighborhood. Dahl’s experiences spurred him to come to Princeton to learn more about how to have a broader impact. Today, he is a graduate of the Master in Public Affairs Program at the University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. In this video, he discusses his unconventional path to Princeton, how he found success here and his dreams for the future.
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by Susan DeSantis for the Office of Engineering Communications
George Luchak, a professor of civil engineering emeritus who taught at Princeton for two decades, died June 6 at his Princeton home. He was 97. Luchak specialized in analyzing technical innovations, including the module that landed men on the moon in 1969. Luchak, who joined the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in 1966, was the first to teach operations research, which uses mathematical modeling to analyze complex situations such as risk analysis, climate study and traffic management.
Thursday, Jun 29, 2017
by The Office of Communications
The 2016-17 academic year at Princeton University has been memorable, with high points ranging from a faculty member’s Nobel Prize to the valedictorian’s commitment to service and community. Throughout the year, the University strengthened its commitments to academic excellence through research and teaching; increased access and inclusion across ability, race, gender and income; reflected on and expanded our service mission; made changes to the campus environment; supported vibrant student experiences; and gathered for major events.
Tuesday, Jun 27, 2017
College football, one of America's most beloved and popular institutions, is getting ready to celebrate a big birthday. And it plans to do so in style. A group of college football leaders announced plans today to launch a nationwide celebration to commemorate the game's 150th birthday. Princeton Ford Family Director of Athletics Mollie Marcoux Samaan has been selected as one of the 13 members of this committee.
Monday, Jun 19, 2017
by Jamie Saxon & Danielle Alio, Office of Communications
From Petipa to Puccini to Shakespeare, classical works of dance, opera and theater are often adapted to contemporary times. This spring at Princeton, a rarely performed pantomime-ballet — “Within the Quota,” with music by American composer Cole Porter — was reimagined to reflect the current political climate. The original 1923 production responded to restrictive immigration quotas based on national origin that were enacted in 1921. Students of the Princeton University Ballet mounted the new production in Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall on Thursday, May 4. Porter’s music was performed live in a new arrangement prepared by Simon Morrison, professor of music, and the London-based Penguin Cafe, whose 10 members traveled to Princeton for the show. When he composed the score for “Within the Quota,” Porter was an ambitious young songsmith. He was deeply troubled by the Emergency Quota Act of 1921, which slashed immigration into the United States and established strict quotas based on the 1910 census to ensure an unchanging ethnic and religious population. Porter’s acerbic 16-minute pantomime-ballet, a series of duets in which an immigrant meets — and dances with — a series of American stereotypes from a New York heiress to a Hollywood starlet, tested the truth of America as a nation of immigrants.
Wednesday, Jun 14, 2017
by Steven Runk, Lewis Center for the Arts
Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced the appointment of Princeton University professor Tracy K. Smith as the Library’s 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, for 2017-18. Smith is the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and a professor of creative writing in the Lewis Center for the Arts. She will take up her duties in the fall, opening the Library of Congress’s annual literary season with a reading of her work at the Coolidge Auditorium. “It gives me great pleasure to appoint Tracy K. Smith, a poet of searching,” Hayden said. “Her work travels the world and takes on its voices; brings history and memory to life; calls on the power of literature as well as science, religion and pop culture. With directness and deftness, she contends with the heavens or plumbs our inner depths — all to better understand what makes us most human.”
Wednesday, Jun 14, 2017
by Lewis Center for the Arts
Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts and the Department of Music will celebrate the opening of the new Lewis Arts complex with a multi-day Festival of the Arts on October 5 through 8 on the Princeton campus. The Festival, which is open to the public, will feature dozens of concerts, plays, readings, dance performances, art exhibitions, multidisciplinary presentations, community workshops and site-specific events at venues across the campus, most of which will be free. The new multi-building arts complex along Alexander Street and University Place on the south edge of campus, adjacent to McCarter Theater, will take the arts at Princeton to even greater heights by significantly expanding the performance, rehearsal and teaching spaces for the arts in new state-of-the-art, purpose-built facilities.
Monday, May 15, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
James Baker, the 61st U.S. Secretary of State, a 1952 graduate of Princeton and former trustee, gave the Taplin Lecture, “A Conservative Approach to Climate Change,” at McCosh Hall yesterday. He presented a plan he developed with several prominent Republicans to garner conservative support for curbing carbon emissions and curtailing the effects of climate change.
Friday, May 12, 2017
by Jeanne Laymon, Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students
Eight students have been named winners of the 2017 Spirit of Princeton Award, honoring Princeton University undergraduates for positive contributions to campus life, three of these winners are from NJ. The award recognizes those who have demonstrated a strong commitment to the undergraduate experience through dedicated efforts in student organizations, athletics, community service, religious life, residential life and the arts. This year's winners were selected from a group of over 80 nominees and were honored with a certificate and book prize during a dinner on May 10. The Spirit of Princeton Award is sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students and has been given annually since 1995.
Monday, Apr 17, 2017
by the Office of Communications
Through its comprehensive campus planning effort, Princeton University has identified a potential site for a new undergraduate residential college south of Poe Field and east of Elm Drive and potential sites for the expansion of engineering and environmental studies on lands along the north side of Ivy Lane and Western Way, west of FitzRandolph Road.
Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017
by the Office of Communications
Princeton University's trustees have adopted the University's operating budget for 2017-18, which includes an 8.7 percent increase to $161.2 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is genuinely affordable for every admitted student.
Tuesday, Feb 28, 2017
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
As part of Princeton University's ongoing efforts to increase diversity and inclusion, three academic departments have created pilot programs that build bridges between undergraduate coursework and doctoral programs for promising young scholars from underrepresented backgrounds. The pilot programs in astrophysical sciences, physics and politics offer a select number of recent bachelor's degree graduates the opportunity to spend between one and two years on campus taking courses and conducting research. The goals of the non-degree programs are to help the scholars gain admission to top-tier doctoral programs and to help diversify their fields on campus and beyond. Brandon Johnson is one student who came to the bridge program in the Department of Politics in January 2016 after finishing his bachelor's degree in political science from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey.
Thursday, Feb 2, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber and 47 other American college and university presidents today sent a letter to President Trump urging him to "rectify or rescind the recent executive order closing our country's borders to immigrants and others from seven majority-Muslim countries and to refugees from throughout the world." "If left in place," the letter says, "the order threatens both American higher education and the defining principles of our country." The letter was initially drafted by Eisgruber and University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann.
Tuesday, Jan 10, 2017
by Susan Promislo, Office of Communications
Princeton University has a substantial impact on the New Jersey economy, generating an annual total of $1.58 billion in economic output as an employer, research and innovation leader, sponsor of construction projects, purchaser of goods and services, and financial and civic contributor to local communities. That total supports an estimated 13,450 jobs with $970.7 million in earnings. The economic and other benefits the University generates within the town of Princeton and neighboring communities, Mercer County and the state of New Jersey are presented in a new report, "Education, Innovation and Opportunity: The Economic Impact of Princeton University."
Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016
by office of Communications
Princeton University now has one of the highest percentages of Pell-eligible students among the nation's most selective colleges and universities, with 21 percent of the freshman Class of 2020 eligible for the federal grants that are awarded to low-income students. The percentage of Pell-eligible freshmen is triple that of the Class of 2008.
Tuesday, Nov 1, 2016
by Maya Wahrman, Office of Religious Life
What could be a better welcome to America than carving pumpkins? That's what Matt Weiner, Princeton University's associate dean of religious life, and Patrick Barry, director of refugee and immigration services for Catholic Charities in Camden, New Jersey, were thinking when they brought 25 refugee youths to carve pumpkins with Princeton students one sunny Saturday in October. The refugees were mainly from Syria and Myanmar, and the Princeton students were from the Class of 2019.
Monday, Oct 17, 2016
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Improving access to affordable housing is a critical challenge around the country and across the globe. It's also an urgent concern just across Nassau Street from the University campus, in the municipality of Princeton. That made it a perfect fit for the inaugural Tiger Challenge, a program designed to help Princeton students tackle complex, real-world problems by providing support and nurturing their curiosity, creativity, compassion and courage. A team of four undergraduates spent part of the summer learning about affordable housing in Princeton through research and conversations with residents, municipal officials, affordable-housing experts and Tiger Challenge mentors.
Thursday, Oct 13, 2016
by The Office of Communications
"Behind the scenes" is a common phrase in the performance world. At Princeton University, one "performance" in particular that has been going on behind the scenes for nearly a decade will premiere in one year. On the weekend of Thursday through Saturday, Oct. 5-7, 2017, the new Lewis Center for the Arts — a dynamic multi-facility complex that will greatly expand the performance, rehearsal and teaching spaces for the arts — will open its doors and spaces to the University and greater Princeton community.
Monday, Oct 10, 2016
by Danielle Alio, Office of Communications
Since 2009, the Princeton University Volunteer Fire Program has been serving both the University and surrounding community. The program consists of about 30 University staff members who volunteer during business hours to respond to emergencies with the Princeton Fire Department. For the Princeton Fire Department, which is an all-volunteer organization, the program ensures support during the day with University volunteers when town volunteers may be unable to answer a call.
Tuesday, Oct 4, 2016
by The Office of Communications
Princeton University professor F. Duncan Haldane has been awarded the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physics "for theoretical discoveries of topological phase transitions and topological phases of matter." Haldane, the Eugene Higgins Professor of Physics who joined the Princeton faculty in 1990, shares the prize with David Thouless of the University of Washington and J. Michael Kosterlitz of Brown University.
Tuesday, Sep 20, 2016
by Daniel Day, Office of Communications
Representatives of Princeton University gave a status report Monday, Sept. 19, to town of Princeton residents, council members and planning committee members on the 2026 Campus Plan that is being developed. The new plan, which will succeed the University's 2016 Campus Plan coming to a close, will establish a framework to guide the evolution of the campus through 2026 and beyond. The plan will encompass most of the land the University owns and will consider two planning horizons: a 10-year horizon to provide detailed guidance on near-term growth and change, and a 30-year horizon to establish a broader strategy for development of campus over the next generation.
Tuesday, Sep 20, 2016
by Office of Communications
Organized by the Office of Community and Regional Affairs, the annual Community and Staff Day featured a Family Fun Fest at Princeton Stadium. Several local nonprofits and University departments set up booths with crafts, music, face painting, bounce houses and games throughout the stadium concourse. University student-athletes hosted a youth sports clinic — including baseball, basketball, crew, fencing, lacrosse, softball and track and field, among others — on Weaver Track next to the stadium. The fun concluded with the Princeton football team's home opener against Lafayette College, to which 12,000 area residents received free tickets. After the game — which Princeton won, 35 to 31 — fireworks lit up the sky.
Monday, Aug 22, 2016
by Office of Communications
Three of the 13 Princeton students and alumni competing won medals at the 2016 Olympic Games that concluded Sunday, Aug. 21, in Rio de Janeiro. Rising senior Ashleigh Johnson won a gold medal with the U.S. women's water polo team, Gevvie Stone of the Class of 2007 won a silver medal in women's individual rowing for Team USA, and Diana Matheson of the Class of 2008 won a bronze medal on the Canadian women's soccer team.
Monday, Jul 25, 2016
by Mel Policicchio, Woodrow Wilson School
Candidates for Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs usually enter the School's degree programs with real-world professional experience. Students with military backgrounds also bring a global viewpoint of the effect public policy has on the ground. Their leadership and experience in the field enriches classroom conversations. Learn about four of these students.
Friday, May 6, 2016
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Frist Campus Center was the center of Princeton University's research universe Thursday afternoon as more than 150 undergraduates, graduate students and postdoctoral researchers presented their work at the first Princeton Research Day. The event highlighted research from the natural sciences, engineering, social sciences, humanities and the arts in formats including talks, poster presentations, performances, art exhibitions and digital presentations — all designed with the general public in mind.
Friday, May 6, 2016
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Princeton University has made significant progress during the past year to foster a more inclusive campus climate, and continues to implement new programs and practices related to issues of diversity, equity and inclusion.
Wednesday, Apr 13, 2016
by the Office of Communications
The contested legacy of Woodrow Wilson forms the focus of an exhibition now on display in the Bernstein Gallery of Robertson Hall. The show, "In the Nation's Service? Woodrow Wilson Revisited," documents not only the positive but also the negative aspects of Wilson's tenure as 13th president of Princeton University and 28th president of the United States. The show, which runs through Oct. 28, is open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and until 4:30 p.m. during the summer months.
Tuesday, Apr 12, 2016
by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications
Building on its commitment of providing sustainable and convenient transportation options for faculty, staff, students and the community, Princeton University has expanded its bike-share program by 60 bicycles that can be borrowed at various points around campus. The new bikes augment a successful bike-rental pilot program the University launched in November 2014 with 10 bikes available at Princeton Station.
Tuesday, Apr 12, 2016
by the Office of Communications
Princeton University's trustees have adopted the University's operating budget for 2016-17, which includes a 6.6 percent increase to $147.4 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is genuinely affordable for every admitted student. Princeton provides financial aid in the form of grants, which do not have to be repaid. It does not require any borrowing, so students can graduate debt free.
Saturday, Apr 9, 2016
by Steven Schultz, School of Engineering and Applied Science Communications
Emily A. Carter, a Princeton faculty member since 2004 and founding director of the University's Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, has been selected as the next dean of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. Her appointment is effective July 1. Carter is the Gerhard R. Andlinger Professor in Energy and the Environment and a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and applied and computational mathematics. She has earned wide recognition for fundamental research contributions as well as for her vision for harnessing science and policy to produce lasting solutions to societal problems, including those of energy and the environment.
Thursday, Mar 31, 2016
by Office of Admission and the Office of Communications
Princeton University's financial aid policy is recognized as among the most generous in the country. The University's robust financial aid packages are built on grants rather than loans, which allow students to graduate debt free. This makes a Princeton education affordable for any student who is admitted to the University. In fact, Princeton is likely to be more affordable than a state university for lower- and middle-income students.
Saturday, Feb 20, 2016
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
The recipients of Princeton's top alumni awards stressed the value of service and the power of public policy during the University's annual Alumni Day on Saturday, Feb. 20. James Heckman, the Henry Schultz Distinguished Service Professor in Economics and the College at the University of Chicago and a winner of the Nobel Prize in economics, received the James Madison Medal, the University's top honor for Graduate School alumni. Heckman earned a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton in 1971. Gen. Mark Milley, chief of staff of the U.S. Army and a member of the Class of 1980, received the Woodrow Wilson Award, the University's highest honor for undergraduate alumni.
Wednesday, Feb 17, 2016
by Takim Williams, Class of 2016
He arrived onstage without a violin — neither his 1714 Soil Stradivarius nor his Guarneri del Gesu 1743 Sauret, which he has played on concert stages around the world — and still gave a command performance. On Tuesday, Feb. 10, world-renowned violinist Itzhak Perlman — winner of 16 Grammy Awards and a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom — and his wife, fellow Juilliard graduate Toby Perlman, opened the Class of 2016's Last Lectures series in Richardson Auditorium at Princeton with a talk titled "My Goal Is to Not Be Bored by What I Do."
Thursday, Feb 4, 2016
by Staff
Princeton University's Office of Religious Life supports a community of many faiths in the exploration of religious, moral and ethical questions. "We have a wonderful time learning from each other and with each other about what we each believe, what we value, where our commitments are, and what we want to do to contribute to just and equitable societies around the world," said Alison Boden, dean of religious life and the chapel, who has led the office since 2007.
Monday, Feb 1, 2016
by Jeanne Jackson DeVoe, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
Shannon Greco, a science education program leader at PPPL, has been named one of the YWCA Princeton’s “women of excellence” for her work with young women and disadvantaged youth, including her help in starting two all-girls robotics teams for the YWCA Princeton.
Wednesday, Jan 27, 2016
by Christopher L. Eisgruber
Protests about racial justice have roiled campuses across America this fall, including at Princeton. Many alumni have asked me about the causes for this turmoil. Media pundits and others often suggest that students today are simply too quick to take offense, and in some cases are taking offense when it is not intended. On occasion students have seemed to demand that they be insulated from any viewpoints or behaviors that make them feel disrespected or unwelcome. Many find this trend alarming, and for good reason. Freedom of speech is a bedrock value at Princeton and every great university. Teaching, learning, and research depend on the open and honest exchange of ideas.
Wednesday, Jan 27, 2016
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
Junior Colin Lualdi is a physics major at Princeton University, and he is Deaf. Lualdi capitalizes the "D" in Deaf as a way of embracing the Deaf community, and he has welcomed his role as Princeton's only Deaf student. By teaching sign language to his fellow students, establishing an American Sign Language (ASL) club and language table, and advocating for ASL-related classes in the curriculum, he has connected a community of people interested in ASL on campus.
Monday, Jan 25, 2016
by the Office of Communications
Nine scholars and biographers with expertise about Woodrow Wilson have submitted letters outlining their perspectives on the former Princeton and U.S. president to a University trustee committee considering his campus legacy. The letters are available to read on the Wilson legacy website, where the trustee committee also invites the public to offer observations and opinions on Wilson.
Wednesday, Jan 20, 2016
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
In 2013, Princeton University adopted a comprehensive strategy to increase the diversity of faculty, staff, postdoctoral fellows and graduate students as part of broader goals to create a more diverse and inclusive community. Since then, the University has launched various initiatives focused on faculty hiring, graduate student recruiting and mentoring, and staff development and training. Provost David S. Lee and Dean of the Faculty Deborah Prentice recently spoke about the University's commitment to diversity and the progress of specific initiatives focused on faculty.
Monday, Jan 18, 2016
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Princeton University honored Martin Luther King Jr. during a Jan. 18 ceremony featuring reflections on the civil rights leader's legacy, remarks on the continued quest for racial justice in the United States, musical performances from the Trenton Central High School Inspiration Choir, and a recognition of community and campus service efforts. In his introductory remarks, President Christopher L. Eisgruber said this year's event was especially meaningful because "the nation is once again in a period of heightened attention to questions of racial justice."
Sunday, Nov 22, 2015
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Princeton University alumna Katherine Clifton, a member of the Class of 2015, and seniors Richard Lu, Cameron Platt and Evan Soltas have been awarded Rhodes Scholarships for graduate study at the University of Oxford. They are among the 32 American recipients of the prestigious fellowships, which fund two to three years of graduate study at Oxford. Soltas, of Rumson, New Jersey, is concentrating in economics and pursuing a certificate in statistics and machine learning. At Oxford, he plans to pursue an M.Sc. in applied statistics, combined with an M.Sc. by research in his second year.
Thursday, Nov 19, 2015
by Trenton Community Music School staff
Trenton children beginning music study will have their own instruments to take home for practicing, and neglected instruments will find a whole new life, as Princeton University’s Office of Public Affairs and WWFM The Classical Network host Instruments of Change, benefitting the Trenton Community Music School. From November 30 through December 4, the week after Thanksgiving, the Office of Public Affairs will open its doors for members of the community whose musical instruments are in need of a good home.
Tuesday, Nov 17, 2015
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), Princeton held a public conversation on Nov. 16 featuring NEH Chairman William "Bro" Adams and presentations by prominent scholars at the University as well as public humanities advocates. The event, "Community and University: 50 Years of the National Endowment for the Humanities," was sponsored by the Council of the Humanities, Princeton Public Library and the New Jersey Council for the Humanities.
Monday, Nov 9, 2015
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
This month the world is celebrating the 100th anniversary of Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity, which shaped our concepts of space, time and gravity, and spurred generations of scientists to contemplate new ideas about the universe. The anniversary was celebrated on Nov. 5-6 at a conference co-hosted by Princeton University and the Institute for Advanced Study in the town of Princeton. Einstein's theory of general relativity, set down in a series of lectures in Berlin in late 1915, predicted many features of the universe — including black holes and gravitational waves — for which we now have experimental evidence.
Friday, Oct 30, 2015
by the Office of Community and Regional Affairs
Be amazed by a faculty science lecture, explore the University's green spaces, listen to a children's concert, or come and relax in the gallery of our children's library. There's plenty for families to do at Princeton University. The University offers a variety of quality programs — many of which are free and open to the public — in areas such as the arts, athletics, literacy and science. Under the umbrella of "YouthCampus," the Office of Community and Regional Affairs lists these programs online and sends email alerts about upcoming programs to subscribers.
Monday, Oct 26, 2015
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Members of the Princeton community came together Saturday, Oct. 24, to remember the beautiful minds and hearts of two of its beloved members, Nobel Prize-winning mathematician John Nash Jr. and his wife, Alicia, who were killed in an automobile crash May 23. He was 86, she was 82.
Thursday, Oct 22, 2015
by the Office of Admission and the Office of Communications
Princeton University's financial aid policy is recognized as among the most generous in the country. The University's robust financial aid packages are built on grants rather than loans, which allow students to graduate debt free. This makes a Princeton education affordable for any student who is admitted to the University. In fact, Princeton is likely to be more affordable than a state university for lower- and middle-income students.
Wednesday, Oct 21, 2015
by Min Pullan, Office of Communications
Interspersed among Princeton University's historic buildings and grounds are major construction and renovation projects that are gradually changing the appearance of the campus. Most of the projects - including the new construction of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, the new New Jersey Transit Dinky Station, and the Lakeside Graduate Housing complex - were first conceptualized for the University's 10-year Campus Plan, which runs through 2016.
Tuesday, Oct 13, 2015
by Stacey Huang, Class of 2016, for the Office of Engineering Communications
Ten years ago, the founding director of Princeton University's new center for engineering education set a simple goal: "To inject more engineering into the liberal arts and inject more of the liberal arts into engineering." This purpose was reflected in the center's inaugural programs: the integrated Engineering, Mathematics and Physics course for incoming engineers, a set of cross-disciplinary courses including an entrepreneurship class, and the first annual Innovation Forum. Over the past 10 years, the Keller Center has continued these initiatives and expanded much further.
Monday, Oct 12, 2015
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Princeton University professor Angus Deaton has been awarded the 2015 Nobel Prize in economics for his contributions to understanding consumption at the individual level and in aggregate. Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs and a professor of economics and international affairs in Princeton's Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, has been a faculty member at Princeton since 1983. Deaton was honored with the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences for his work in "consumption, poverty and welfare," the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences noted in announcing the award.
Thursday, Oct 8, 2015
by Sharon Adarlo, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Meandering paths, sunken courtyards, trees, flowers and shrubs weave through the sculptural complex of gray brick and glass that has risen at the eastern edge of the Princeton University campus. After over three years of construction, the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment is about to open its doors, ushering in a new phase for the center's goal to develop solutions to ensure our energy and environmental future.
Tuesday, Oct 6, 2015
by Staff
Recipients of the 2015 Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry - Arthur B. McDonald and Tomas Lindahl - can trace their prize-winning work to their time at Princeton University.
Wednesday, Sep 30, 2015
by B. Rose Huber, Woodrow Wilson School
The public service papers of Paul A. Volcker, former chairman of the Federal Reserve, are now part of the permanent collection of Princeton University, where the economist earned his undergraduate degree in 1949. These documents, which include correspondence, speeches, reports and memos, are housed in the Seeley G. Mudd Manuscript Library, a division of the Princeton University Library's Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.
Thursday, Sep 24, 2015
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Princeton University continues to broaden its online teaching and learning efforts and has become a charter member of the edX Consortium. As a result, millions of learners will have the opportunity to take free classes offered by Princeton faculty on the edX online platform. The first course taught by a Princeton faculty member on edX is scheduled to begin in October. Jennifer Widner, a professor of politics and international affairs at the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, will lead the course "Making Government Work in Hard Places."
Thursday, Sep 24, 2015
by Erin Firestone, Princeton University Art Museum
A monumental new glass, steel and bronze sculpture by leading contemporary artists Doug and Mike Starn - identical twins born in New Jersey and now based in New York - has been placed on the lawn of the Princeton University Art Museum. The newly commissioned work, weighing nearly eight tons, is constructed of six 18-foot-tall vividly colored glass panels — featuring a new glass-dyeing technique pioneered in Germany — and two cast bronze forms resembling tree limbs. Titled "(Any) Body Oddly Propped," it was designed by the Starns specifically for the site and continues the artists' long fascination with energy systems found in nature.
Monday, Sep 21, 2015
by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications
Lake Carnegie, which bounds the south end of campus, is one of Princeton's most open and natural spaces, a resource to the University and the local community as well as a home to wildlife. Its immensity glistens in the sun. On days when the sky ends with a low, dusky cover of clouds, the lake seems to widen until it swallows the dull horizon. Animals of all types live in its waters and roam its forested shores. It's a part of campus where nearly anyone can show up and not look out of place: fishermen; students and tourists in rented kayaks; ice skaters and hockey players; young lovers on a secluded shore. There's no application, no entrance fee.
Wednesday, Sep 16, 2015
by Morgan Kelly and Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
Over 900 incoming freshman spent the early weeks of September bonding with their new classmates over activities like camping out at the Princeton-Blairstown Center in Harwick; working the fields of a Titusville farm; and volunteering at Mercer County food banks. These activites, organized into small group trips through the campus organizations Outdoor Action and Community Action, are part of a series of orientation events to help freshmen become familiar with one another, the University and the community they'll live in for the next four years.
Monday, Aug 31, 2015
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Visitors to Princeton University's Prospect Gardens may be familiar with the cheerful orange marigolds, pops of pink petunias and bunches of begonias blooming around the lush grounds. What they may not know is that most flowers planted there and in other campus gardens get their start just down the road in the University's greenhouses. Princeton is one of a handful of non-agricultural universities to have its own greenhouses and nursery, which are located off main campus behind Windsor and Rickerson fields.
Tuesday, Jul 28, 2015
by Princeton Athletics
Guided by the motto, "Got your six", and Head Coach Courtney Banghart, the Princeton women's basketball team closed out their regular season with a historic 30-0 record and went on to the second round of the Women's NCAA tournament for the first time in the team's history. Watch this video to learn more about the players, the coaches and their remarkable season.
Thursday, Jul 23, 2015
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
For their final project, Princeton students in the spring course "Food, Literature and the American Racial Diet" worked in teams to create dishes that illustrated various aspects of how food interacts with racial identity. Each team was paired with a chef from Campus Dining who advised them on food ingredients, preparation and presentation. The dishes were presented and tasted at an event called the "Princeton Feast" held April 30 in the Frist Campus Center, attended by students, faculty and staff.
Monday, Jul 13, 2015
by Michael Hotchkiss and Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
As beach bags, backpacks and airline carry-ons are being packed, summer begs its perennial question "What are you reading?” Six Princeton professors talk about how the books on their shelves relate to their scholarship and teaching, highlight one or two favorite books and share what's on their own summer reading (and in one case, film) lists.
Thursday, Jul 9, 2015
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton University is expanding its online course offerings through Kadenze, an online learning platform specifically created to support the arts and creative technologies. On this platform, Princeton Professor of Music Daniel Trueman will offer the course "Reinventing the Piano," in which students will explore a new instrument called the Prepared Digital Piano. Anyone wishing to enroll in Princeton's open online courses may do so at no charge.
Thursday, Jul 2, 2015
by Office of Communications
Even as July 4 is recognized nationwide for the signing of the Declaration of Independence in 1776, the date has additional significance for the town of Princeton, which made history on that same date seven years later. On July 4, 1783, the town received a letter from the president of the Continental Congress confirming that Princeton would be the home of the U.S. government in the waning months of the American Revolutionary War.