Arts at Princeton

Thursday, Nov 9, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The Princeton and Slavery Project is creating opportunities for Princeton students and community members to explore the project's findings through arts classes, newly commissioned plays and an art installation.
Thursday, Nov 9, 2017
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
Most of the work in developing artistic skill happens behind the scenes, alone in a practice room or with a teacher in a teaching studio. But Princeton University offers students and the community another chance to learn by inviting well-known professional performers and artists to become teachers in a communal setting, through a variety of master class offerings on campus.
Tuesday, Oct 10, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
During a four-day Festival of the Arts, Oct. 5-8, Princeton University celebrated the opening of the new Lewis Arts complex with a bonanza of events, open to the public. More than 100 events across arts genres took place in more than 30 venues of every shape and size, from the expansive University Chapel to a tiny “Theatre for One” mobile unit, from a high-tech black box theater to a sun-drenched outdoor plaza.
Thursday, Oct 5, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
The Lewis Arts complex features buildings that work both independently and synergistically; an underground Forum that promotes collaboration, community and connectivity; and myriad architectural details that reflect and promote the artistic process.
Monday, Oct 2, 2017
by Nick Barberio, Office of Communications
In June, Princeton graduate student Andrew Or and Nico Toy of the Class of 2018 traveled to the Steinway & Sons factory in Queens, New York, with music lecturers Margaret Kampmeier and Jennifer Tao to select the last of 48 new pianos that have been purchased for the University’s new Lewis Arts complex.
Tuesday, Sep 19, 2017
by Princeton University Art Museum
Get a behind-the-scenes view into the making of two spectacular, site-specific works by the internationally acclaimed artist Shahzia Sikander that were unveiled at Princeton in April 2017. Soaring above the forum of the Julis Romo Rabinowitz Building—the new home for the Department of Economics—is the site of Quintuplet Effect, where layered images of flight, descent, material economies, and spiritual transcendence invite contemplation and conversation. Nearby, as one climbs the stairs in the Louis A. Simpson International Building, a shimmering, sixty-six-foot-high glass and ceramic scroll entitled Ecstasy as Sublime, Heart as Vector takes visitors on a journey from the mortal bonds of humanity to the realm of abstraction.
Friday, Sep 15, 2017
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts and Department of Music will celebrate the opening of the new Lewis Arts complex with a Festival of the Arts Oct. 5 through 8, open to the public. The festival will feature over 100 concerts, plays, readings, dance performances, art exhibitions, multidisciplinary presentations, film screenings, community workshops, performances by student arts groups and site-specific events at venues across the campus, most of which will be free.
Wednesday, Sep 6, 2017
by Office of Communications
A new work by the internationally acclaimed artist Maya Lin has been commissioned for the grounds adjacent to the new Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University. Princeton University’s installation will provide a landmark for visitors to campus and an invigorated outdoor setting for students to stage ad hoc performances and enjoy plein air classes. Additional details about the commission will be announced later in September.
Monday, Jun 19, 2017
by Jamie Saxon & Danielle Alio, Office of Communications
From Petipa to Puccini to Shakespeare, classical works of dance, opera and theater are often adapted to contemporary times. This spring at Princeton, a rarely performed pantomime-ballet — “Within the Quota,” with music by American composer Cole Porter — was reimagined to reflect the current political climate. The original 1923 production responded to restrictive immigration quotas based on national origin that were enacted in 1921. Students of the Princeton University Ballet mounted the new production in Richardson Auditorium at Alexander Hall on Thursday, May 4. Porter’s music was performed live in a new arrangement prepared by Simon Morrison, professor of music, and the London-based Penguin Cafe, whose 10 members traveled to Princeton for the show. When he composed the score for “Within the Quota,” Porter was an ambitious young songsmith. He was deeply troubled by the Emergency Quota Act of 1921, which slashed immigration into the United States and established strict quotas based on the 1910 census to ensure an unchanging ethnic and religious population. Porter’s acerbic 16-minute pantomime-ballet, a series of duets in which an immigrant meets — and dances with — a series of American stereotypes from a New York heiress to a Hollywood starlet, tested the truth of America as a nation of immigrants.
Wednesday, Jun 14, 2017
by Lewis Center for the Arts
Princeton University’s Lewis Center for the Arts and the Department of Music will celebrate the opening of the new Lewis Arts complex with a multi-day Festival of the Arts on October 5 through 8 on the Princeton campus. The Festival, which is open to the public, will feature dozens of concerts, plays, readings, dance performances, art exhibitions, multidisciplinary presentations, community workshops and site-specific events at venues across the campus, most of which will be free. The new multi-building arts complex along Alexander Street and University Place on the south edge of campus, adjacent to McCarter Theater, will take the arts at Princeton to even greater heights by significantly expanding the performance, rehearsal and teaching spaces for the arts in new state-of-the-art, purpose-built facilities.

Pages