News

Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications
Sewage treatment — an unglamorous backbone of urban living — could offer a cost-effective way to combat climate change by flushing greenhouse gases from the atmosphere.
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
Doctors in intensive care units face a continual dilemma: Every blood test they order could yield critical information, but also adds costs and risks for patients. To address this challenge, researchers from Princeton University are developing a computational approach to help clinicians more effectively monitor patients’ conditions and make...
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Kevin McElwee for the Office of the Dean for Research
When it comes to green living, nobody does it better than plants. When plants convert light into fuel through photosynthesis, not a single particle of light is wasted. If we could unlock plants’ secrets, we might be able to perfect the design of light harvesting in solar cells. Gregory Scholes, Princeton’s William S. Tod Professor of Chemistry,...
Tuesday, Jan 15, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
The growing use of artificial intelligence in both everyday life and life-altering decisions brings up complex questions of fairness, privacy and accountability. Surrendering human authority to machines raises concerns for many people. At the same time, AI technologies have the potential to help society move beyond human biases and make better use...
Thursday, Jan 10, 2019
by Jamie Saxon, Office of Communications
Princeton University will join with community organizations on Monday, Jan. 21, to support the Arts Council of Princeton’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day community event. The free program, which will be held from 9 a.m. to noon at the council’s Paul Robeson Center for the Arts, includes live music, interactive workshops and discussions relating...
Thursday, Jan 10, 2019
by Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang
In his farewell address, President Barack Obama identified a number of “fault lines” in American society from politics to economics to race. In this episode, Sam Wang discusses these societal divisions with regular podcast co-host Julian Zelizer and guest Kevin Kruse — co-authors of a new book on contemporary American history. Released this week...
Wednesday, Jan 9, 2019
by Denise Valenti for the Office of Communications
Princeton faculty members Kevin Kruse and Julian Zelizer are well-known for their efforts to explain U.S. history and current events to the broad public.Now, Kruse and Zelizer have written “Fault Lines: A History of the United States Since 1974,” exploring the divisive domestic politics that have come to characterize the last 40 years of U.S....
Wednesday, Jan 9, 2019
by Emily Aronson, Office of Communications
Princeton University’s latest sustainable innovation can be found along the edge of campus just behind FitzRandolph Observatory. There, under a white tent, hums a new biodigester that turns food waste into nutrient-rich compost. Since operations began in fall 2018, more than 16 tons of food scraps have been converted into compost.
Wednesday, Jan 9, 2019
by The Office of Communications
A transformative gift from an alumni couple will enable Princeton to expand its Bridge Year program, which allows a group of incoming undergraduate students to spend their first two semesters as Princetonians engaged in community service abroad.
Tuesday, Jan 8, 2019
by Molly Sharlach, Office of Engineering Communications
Professor Claire Gmachl teaches a first-year physics course on “Mechanics, Energy, and Waves,” part of a new sequence of courses for first-year undergraduates in the School of Engineering and Applied Science. The courses present the same math and physics as more traditional course offerings, but place a greater emphasis on problem-solving in the...

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