News

Thursday, Dec 22, 2016
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Should the government play a major or minor role in the lives of American citizens? This core question resurfaces during each election and continues to divide the political parties. It turns out that this argument is not new. In his newest book, Yale historian Steve Pincus challenges those who argue that the Declaration of Independence should be used for political guidance today, saying it’s in favor of limited government. Pincus shows that the Declaration of Independence actually gives the government more power, primarily to promote and protect citizens’ welfare. What was the original intent of the founding fathers? And is the document still applicable today? In episode #25, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Pincus, who examines these issues in his new book: “Heart of the Declaration: The Founders’ Case for an Activist Government."
Thursday, Dec 15, 2016
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Polarization was a strong undercurrent to the 2016 presidential election, powerfully affecting the electorate and politics. Looking toward President-elect Donald Trump’s cabinet appointments, those same divisions remain clear. As Trump builds his team, the nation is beginning to see the outlines of a Trump administration - one that fits well with congressional Republicans. In their first live recording of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss Trump’s recent appointments, the state of polarization today and how the polls got it wrong in the recent election.
Thursday, Dec 15, 2016
by Rochelle Hendricks, NJ Secretary of Higher Education
I recently had the opportunity to meet some of the members of the armed forces who are furthering their education while serving our country. The service members were attending the Veteran Career and Resource Event hosted by Thomas Edison State University (TESU) at the Sun National Bank Center in Trenton. Attendees were connected with job opportunities, interview and resume tips as well as resources to help ease their transition to civilian life.
Thursday, Dec 8, 2016
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Since Donald Trump’s election, there has been considerable debate about what the Democratic party should do next. While some Democrats argue for an openness to cooperation, others insist there isn’t room for compromise given Trump’s views on race and individual rights. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview one of the most powerful voices in this debate: Jamelle Bouie. In his writing, Bouie — who serves as Slate’s chief political correspondent — has tackled a host of issues from white nationalism to minority voters to Trump’s vision of Black America. His work has appeared either online or in print at The New Yorker, The Washington Post, The Nation and other publications. He also serves as a political analyst for CBS News.
Thursday, Dec 1, 2016
by Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang
The vacant seat on the U.S. Supreme Court has returned to the spotlight, with President-elect Donald Trump promising supporters that he will nominate a conservative justice, and Democrats fuming from Senate Republicans’ refusal to hold a vote on Obama nominee Merrick Garland. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Linda Greenhouse about how a Trump presidency may affect the U.S. Supreme Court. Greenhouse is the Knight Distinguished Journalist in Residence and Joseph Goldstein Lecturer in Law at Yale Law School. She covered the Supreme Court for The New York Times between 1978 and 2008 and writes a biweekly column on law. She’s the author of several books, including, most recently, “The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right.”
Friday, Nov 18, 2016
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Political polarization is the worst it’s been since the Civil War, some experts argue. How did we get here? How have America’s ideologies shifted so much in the past four decades? What forces underlie the growing divide between Republicans and Democrats? And how has social media and varying sources of information widened the gap? In episode 21, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss party polarization with Matt Grossmann and David Hopkins, co-authors of the new book, “Asymmetric Politics: Ideological Republicans and Group Interest Democrats.” Published by Oxford University Press, the book provides a new understanding of contemporary polarization.
Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016
by office of Communications
Princeton University now has one of the highest percentages of Pell-eligible students among the nation's most selective colleges and universities, with 21 percent of the freshman Class of 2020 eligible for the federal grants that are awarded to low-income students. The percentage of Pell-eligible freshmen is triple that of the Class of 2008.
Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016
by Office of Communications
$9.12 million in taxes paid in 2016. $22 million in voluntary contributions over seven years. Construction of affordable housing. Direct support for public safety. Local transit service. Educational opportunities. Volunteer service. These are just a few of the ways that Princeton University supports the town of Princeton and the members of its community.
Wednesday, Nov 16, 2016
by Michael Hotchkiss and B. Rose Kelly
During the campaign, President-Elect Donald Trump said he would repeal the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a system that covers 20 million people who were previously uninsured. Now, Trump says he’ll hold on to certain ACA provisions, such as providing care for those with pre-existing conditions. Regardless of what’s being said about the ACA (also known as Obamacare), there are likely to be changes, according to Princeton’s top health care experts. In the following Q&A, they answer questions about the ACA and the future of America’s health care system.
Tuesday, Nov 15, 2016
by Rochelle Hendricks, NJ Secretary of Higher Education
As we work to ensure that students from all backgrounds are well-prepared to meet the future, including access to in-demand jobs, meaningful careers and productive lives, I am delighted to highlight extraordinary New Jersey programs that are models of what can be accomplished through collaboration, creativity, and commitment to excellence and equity. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) career opportunities abound with more than 200,000 of these high-wage, high-demand jobs to be filled by 2025.

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