News

Tuesday, Apr 11, 2017
by the Office of Communications
Princeton University's trustees have adopted the University's operating budget for 2017-18, which includes an 8.7 percent increase to $161.2 million in the undergraduate financial aid budget to continue to ensure that a Princeton education is genuinely affordable for every admitted student.
Friday, Apr 7, 2017
by Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang
As the investigation into Russia’s interference with the 2016 U.S. election continues, President Donald Trump continues to call the story “fake news,” “phony,” and “a total scam,” mostly by way of Twitter. He also continues to try to change the conversation by making groundless allegations, particularly his claim that President Barack Obama wiretapped Trump Tower. What do we know for certain about Trump’s connection to Russia? And what else might be revealed as the Senate and House intelligence committees continue their investigations? To better unravel this ongoing news story, Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Sarah Kendzior, a St. Louis, Mo.-based commentator who writes about politics, the economy and media. The crux of the conversation stems from Kendzior’s recent article, “At long last, a forum where Trump cannot escape the truth."
Friday, Mar 31, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Shortly after the bill to replace the Affordable Care Act was pulled, President Trump called The Washington Post’s Robert Costa to discuss what happened. The President had a “defiant and even-tempered tone," says Costa. The defeat in the House introduced Trump to the realities of the legislative process and Congress' factions. How will Mitch McConnell fare in securing the Senate votes needed to confirm Neil Gorsuch to the Supreme Court? What can these events tell us about Trump’s evolving relationship with and influence over Congress? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Robert Costa for the latest episode of Politics & Polls. Costa is a national political reporter at The Washington Post and a political analyst for NBC News and MSNBC.
Thursday, Mar 23, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Trump’s budget blueprint proposes deep cuts to research at the National Institutes of Health and the Environmental Protection Agency. What lies ahead for scientific expertise and evidence-based policymaking? Are facts, evidence and truth under siege by the new administration? In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Rush D. Holt about the current state of science in the U.S., from public opinion to its role in government decision-making.
Wednesday, Mar 22, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
It's the part of the brain that makes sure you cannot tickle yourself. The cerebellum, an apple-sized region near the base of the skull, senses that your own fingers are the ones trying to tickle, and cancels your usual response. Now an international team of researchers has learned something surprising about this region, which despite its small size contains roughly half of all the neurons in the brain. These neurons, which were thought to fire only rarely as they take in information from the senses, are in fact far more active than previously suspected. The study underscores new theories about the role of the cerebellum, which is increasingly being viewed as involved in cognitive processes both in adulthood and in development. 
Thursday, Mar 16, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
The election of President Donald Trump has challenged the political machine of conservativism. Now, many on the right are grappling with how to make sense of “Trumpism” and whether it fits into the conservative movement that’s been developing over the past few decades. A new policy and political journal, “American Affairs,” aims to intellectualize the Trumpism movement as it unfolds. The publication is led by Julius Krein, a 2008 Harvard University graduate, who joins professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang on this episode of Politics & Polls.
Thursday, Mar 16, 2017
by Robert Perkins, Caltech
We know a lot about how carbon dioxide (CO2) levels can drive climate change, but how about the way that climate change can cause fluctuations in CO2 levels? New research from an international team of scientists reveals one of the mechanisms by which a colder climate was accompanied by depleted atmospheric CO2 during past ice ages. The overall goal of the work is to better understand how and why the earth goes through periodic climate change, which could shed light on how man-made factors could affect the global climate.
Thursday, Mar 16, 2017
by Staff, Department of Molecular Biology
Researchers from Princeton University‘s Department of Molecular Biology have developed a new method that can precisely track the replication of yellow fever virus in individual host immune cells. The technique, which is described in a paper published March 14 in the journal Nature Communications, could aid the development of new vaccines against a range of viruses, including Dengue and Zika. This work was supported by a grant from Princeton University and the New Jersey Commission on Cancer Research.
Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by Gwen McNamara, PACE Communications Coordinator
From creating documentary films in Dallas, Texas to building health and wellness curricula for youth in Charlottesville, VA to supporting programs for previously incarcerated men and women in Los Angeles, CA, 17 first-year students are making service – in all its broad forms – an integral part of their learning at Princeton University as 2017 Bogle Fellows. One of these students is June Philippe of Irvington, NJ who is assisting HS students in Newark with the college application process. She says “as a first-generation student, I’ve noted that a lot of the information that is necessary to a successful college experience is often passed down from those who attended college in their personal networks, however for low-income and first-generation students these resources are not made readily. I’d like to change this narrative in favor of the marginalized.”
Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by Bennett McIntosh for the Office of the Dean for Research
Cities. They sprawl and tangle, juxtaposing ancient public squares and glistening skyscrapers. They provide homes for half of humanity, and economic and cultural centers for the rest. It has taken us thousands of years to build today's urban centers, and yet, they're expected to double in land-area in just the next few decades. Though this growth is inevitable, the way these cities will expand is not. Rather than repeat the sprawling and uncoordinated development patterns of the past, researchers like Bou-Zeid and others in Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science are exploring new ways to build urban infrastructures to serve our growing population, changing civilization and warming planet.

Pages