News

Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
Protected natural areas are the surest way to ensure the survival of the increasing number of plant and animal species that face habitat loss and extinction. Yet, worldwide many of these sanctuaries suffer from inadequate funding, maintenance, enforcement and public support. Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas.
Thursday, Jun 1, 2017
by Josephine Wolff, Office of Engineering Communications
A team of Princeton researchers has developed a method to detect and defend against attacks on the Tor system, which provides anonymity to internet users. Tor was designed in the early 2000s to make it more difficult to trace what people are doing online by routing their traffic through a series of “proxy” servers before it reaches its final destination. This makes it difficult to track Tor users because their connections to a particular server first pass through intermediate Tor servers called relays. But while Tor can be a powerful tool to help protect users’ privacy and anonymity online, it is not perfect.
Thursday, Jun 1, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Donald Trump’s attacks on the media persist while journalists continue to grapple with how to cover such a tumultuous presidency. Amidst the clamor, new voices in journalism have risen to the top, positioning themselves as political power players in a media-saturated world. Among these voices is Lauren Duca, an award-winning journalist at Teen Vogue. In December 2016, Duca penned an essay, “Donald Trump is Gaslighting America,” which argued that Trump relies on deceit to undermine the truth so his critics question their own judgment. The essay quickly went viral, generating more than one million views to date. Duca joins this episode of Politics & Polls to discuss her essay, her work at Teen Vogue and the future of journalism under the Trump administration.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Can foreign aid promote political and economic stability in nations receiving support? Are there certain underlying conditions that make it easier (or harder) for developing countries to adopt stabilizing reforms? A new book by Ethan Kapstein, visiting professor at the Woodrow Wilson School, examines this, tracing the United States’ use of land reform as a vehicle for producing political stability in pro-Western countries.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
President Donald Trump recently returned from an international trip, with stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and Palestine, where he met with top officials and visited sacred spaces. The Woodrow Wilson School discussed Trump’s Middle East visit — and what it means symbolically and politically — with Amb. (Ret.) Daniel C. Kurtzer, lecturer and S. Daniel Abraham Professor in Middle East Policy Studies. Kurtzer served as U.S. ambassador to Egypt from 1997 to 2001 and as U.S. ambassador to Israel from 2001 to 2005.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by Sharon B. Adarlo, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Transportation experts predict that many commuters will pass up typical vehicles and instead hop into fully-automated, driverless cars to get to their destination in the near future. Autonomous vehicles will rule the roadways by the middle of this century, according to recent news articles. They are also predicted to reshape our cities, decrease automobile crashes, cut down congestion, and, of course, disrupt several industries, from private parking lots to car insurance. Engineers at various companies, such as Google and Fiat Chrysler, are hard at work perfecting their own version of the fully-automated driverless vehicle. A few of the sensing technologies that will enable driverless vehicles – self-park steering and lane correction – have already made it into some vehicles on the market today. In the latest “The Andlinger Center Speaks,” Professor Alain Kornhauser at ORFE is interviewed about the environmental implications of these smart, driverless vehicles that are poised to transform our lives. Kornhauser, a pioneering researcher in automated transportation and an expert in automotive engineering systems, recently held a summit on this emerging sector this month.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
More than 100 insider sources helped journalists Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes lift the veil on Hillary Clinton’s campaign and the many avoidable missteps that turned a winnable election into a stunning defeat. Allen and Parnes’ new book, “Shattered: Inside Hillary Clinton’s Doomed Campaign,” digs deeper to illuminate a flawed campaign that resulted in a defeat that shocked the world. In this episode, professor Julian Zelizer interviews Allen and Parnes about their #1 New York Times best-seller.
Friday, May 19, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
New evidence suggests that a nutrient that is both essential to life and an environmental scourge when present in large quantities is increasing in the open ocean, according to a new study published May 19 in the journal Science. The increase of this nutrient, known as “fixed” nitrogen, was studied in coral. The findings give researchers new insight into ocean ecosystems, which in turn provides a greater understanding for scientists and policymakers on how they should prioritize human-made threats to Earth’s biosphere and climate.
Thursday, May 18, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Washington has been hit with a trifecta of catastrophic events in the past week. First, President Donald Trump fired Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey, justifying his decision by pointing toward Comey’s mishandling of the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails. Trump later changed course, admitting he fired Comey for continuing the investigation about Russia’s role in disrupting the 2016 election. Just days later, news broke that Trump shared classified information about the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) with Russian diplomats in the Oval Office — a decision defended by Trump and Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, Trump’s national security advisor. Now, Comey has returned to the spotlight following media reports that he wrote a memo about a conversation in which Trump told him to end the Michael Flynn investigation. How have the dramatic events of this week changed Washington? What’s next in the ongoing saga of the Trump presidency? Is an investigation or impeachment possible? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss this and more in episode #44 of Politics and Polls.
Monday, May 15, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
James Baker, the 61st U.S. Secretary of State, a 1952 graduate of Princeton and former trustee, gave the Taplin Lecture, “A Conservative Approach to Climate Change,” at McCosh Hall yesterday. He presented a plan he developed with several prominent Republicans to garner conservative support for curbing carbon emissions and curtailing the effects of climate change.

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