News

Thursday, Jan 26, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Hailed as one of the largest protests in American history, the Women’s March on Washington gathered hundreds of thousands of people in the district and millions in sister marches across the world. Held just a day after President Donald Trump’s inauguration, the protest was an opportunity for Americans to bring gender and reproductive rights to the forefront, an issue many feel is under threat by a Trump administration. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss the march and reproductive rights with Katha Pollitt, a columnist for The Nation. Pollitt’s column, “Subject to Debate” has been cited as “the best place to go for original thinking on the left.”
Thursday, Jan 19, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
The Democratic Party may be in a “crisis,” many argue, and not only because of a Donald Trump presidency but also due to continued Republican control of Congress. Given these challenges, will the Democrats be able to rebuild their strength? In episode #27 of Politics & Polls, professsors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview leading political scientist Theda Skocpol about her recent article in Vox: “A Guide to Rebuilding the Democratic Party from the Ground Up.” In the piece, Skocpol outlines how the Democratic Party can be rebuilt from the ground up, beginning at the state and local levels.
Thursday, Jan 19, 2017
by Office of Communications
Scientists from Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have produced the first global analysis of how climate change may affect the frequency and location of mild-weather days — and it may be soon. Within the next 20 years, the current global average of 74 mild days a year will drop by four days, and fall by another six days by the end of the century, the researchers report. The hardest hit areas are expected to be in Africa, Asia and Latin America, where some regions could see 15 to 50 fewer days of mild weather each year by 2100. The loss of mild-weather days could mean less relief from extended heat waves, which could significantly affect public health.
Tuesday, Jan 17, 2017
by Maura M. Fennessy
As a major research institution, Princeton University attracts hundreds of millions of federal research dollars to New Jersey each year to develop knowledge that addresses human needs.  In FY2016, sponsored research expenditures at the University and the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory totaled over $307 million; supported 1,433 research proj
Tuesday, Jan 17, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Researchers at Princeton and Rutgers universities have found that the hepatitis E virus — an emerging liver virus historically found in developing countries but now on the rise in Europe — uses a technique to spread infection that scientists could in fact exploit to treat the disease.
Tuesday, Jan 17, 2017
by Sarah M. Binder, Woodrow Wilson School
On Dec. 9, 2016, the Woodrow Wilson School's annual student-organized service auction raised more than $16,000 for Trenton, N.J.-based nonprofit Isles Youth Institute. Isles, founded by Princeton alum Marty Johnson ’81, fosters self-reliant families and healthy, sustainable communities through a mission of “self-reliance through education.”
Thursday, Jan 12, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Since the election, Democrats have struggled with how to respond to a Donald Trump presidency. But one group is starting to get some traction - the authors of an online guide that is going viral: “Indivisible: A Practical Guide for Resisting the Trump Agenda.” Originally posted as a Google document, the guide was co-written by former Congressional staffers Ezra Levin and Angel Padilla, who both received their Master in Public Affairs from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School, Leah Greenberg, and others. At the heart of the publication are two ideas: presidential power is not unlimited, and Congress responds to pressure when applied the right way. Levin and Padilla use their real-world experience with the Tea Party as a model for how citizens can keep the pressure on Congress and get results. In episode #26 of Politics & Polls, Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss the Indivisible guide in depth with Levin and Padilla.
Thursday, Jan 5, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
The global ocean is the Earth's heating and cooling system, pushing balmy tropical waters toward the poles and bringing back colder, nutrient-rich waters. But modeling this system is extremely complex, resulting in billions of data points. To tackle the complexity, researchers at three Princeton-area institutions have transformed complex modeling data into an easily understandable animated movie showing how ocean temperatures and saltiness change over time. The animation could help climate researchers explore how factors such as rising carbon dioxide levels alter the ocean's ability to transport heat.
Thursday, Jan 5, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications
A group of preeminent climate scientists evaluated the scientific work and expert judgments behind the most recent projections from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change regarding the potential ecological, social, economic and meteorological repercussions of climate change. This transparency could help policymakers more confidently prepare for the effects of climate change.
Tuesday, Jan 3, 2017
by Jeanne Jackson DeVoe
A team of scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) has won the 2016 Edison Patent Award for inventing an on-demand method to create a badly needed isotope used routinely in medical imaging devices to diagnose diseases such as cancer and heart disease.

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