News

Thursday, Feb 23, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Almost every U.S. president has struggled to broker peace agreements in the Middle East, especially among Israel and Palestine. For many, the possibility of a peace agreement seems dire, with a two-state solution that seems to be fleeting. But what can we expect to see from President Donald Trump? To unravel these complex issues, Amb. Daniel Kurtzer joins this episode of Politics & Polls with co-hosts Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Wendy Plump, Office of Engineering Communications
Robert Pagels had three minutes to pitch his team's new method to cram several months' worth of medicine into a single injection at the Keller Center’s 12th annual Innovation Forum on Feb. 15. "We like to describe it as a cluster of grapes," said Pagels, a graduate student in chemical and biological engineering who collaborated with fellow student Chester Markwalter. "Each nanoparticle is a grape with its own skin, and we're clustering them together into microparticles. Microparticles are small enough where they can still fit through a needle, but big enough that you can really load a lot of drug." Pagels and Markwalter took the top prize at the Innovation Forum, an event for University researchers to present potentially marketable discoveries, with their technology to package multiple doses of medicine into microscopically small particles for controlled release in a patient.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications
For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that question, particularly for animals in the world's temperate mountain areas. If species are bound to where they live by temperature, they are going to be much more controlled by temperature moving forward than we may have thought. Where they live in the future will likely directly track local temperature changes resulting from global climate change.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Three projects with the potential for broad impacts in science and technology have been selected to receive support from the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund. The projects include a technology for improving ultrasound's grainy images, a system for boosting biofuel production, and a facility for designing and testing new wind power technologies.
Friday, Feb 17, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Donald Trump’s presidency has evoked strong emotional and psychological responses from both the public and the president himself, raising issues not often brought forth in public policy and governance. Many, including members of the media, are trying to make sense of this complicated web of anger, passion, rationality and irrationality. Among those reporters is Jesse Singal of New York Magazine, who is bringing the social sciences into the news amid an often-heated environment. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Singal and discuss, among other topics, his recent articles on fear among conservatives and how the “contact hypothesis” — when members from different groups interact — can diminish prejudice and hatred.
Friday, Feb 10, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
A federal appeals court has blocked President Donald Trump’s executive order issuing an immigration ban barring people from seven predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States. Trump also has made moves toward building a border wall with Mexico, which recent figures suggest may cost an estimated $21 billion. If implemented, what would an immigration ban and a border wall accomplish? In this episode, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang take a deep dive into immigration and border control with Doug Massey, one of the country’s leading experts in this field. Throughout the discussion, Massey busts many myths, including the question of whether the effect of a border wall is to keep people out of the United States - or cage them inside. Massey is the Henry G. Bryant Professor of Sociology and Public Affairs at Princeton University and the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. He studies international migration, race and housing, discrimination, education, urban poverty and Latin America, especially Mexico.
Thursday, Feb 2, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber and 47 other American college and university presidents today sent a letter to President Trump urging him to "rectify or rescind the recent executive order closing our country's borders to immigrants and others from seven majority-Muslim countries and to refugees from throughout the world." "If left in place," the letter says, "the order threatens both American higher education and the defining principles of our country." The letter was initially drafted by Eisgruber and University of Pennsylvania President Amy Gutmann.
Thursday, Feb 2, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
It seems as if America is watching two shows in parallel. On one hand, we’re seeing the political process unfold with cabinet nominees being appointed and executive orders being signed. On the other hand, the country has front-row seats to The Donald Trump Show, a gripping drama filled with unexpected twists and turns. Are we seeing the birth cries of an authoritarian regime? Or is it the gang that couldn't shoot straight? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang debate this and more in episode #29.
Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017
by NJBIZ
Coleen Burrus added one word to her title shortly after being hired by Princeton University in spring 2015. Director of corporate and foundation relations quickly became director of corporate engagement and foundation relations. The simple move was meant to convey a specific shift at the college. "We want to send the message that Princeton wants to be engaged with companies in a comprehensive way," Burrus said. And not just companies; New Jersey companies.
Tuesday, Jan 31, 2017
by Office of Communications
Princeton President Christopher L. Eisgruber issued the following statement to the University community on Sunday, Jan. 29, 2017: Many of you have written to express concerns about the recent federal executive order barring entry to the United States for refugees and for citizens of seven predominantly Muslim countries. I share those concerns. Since its early days, when the College of New Jersey recruited a transformative president from Scotland, this University has depended on America’s ability to attract and engage with talented people from around the world. Princeton today benefits tremendously from the presence of extraordinary individuals of diverse nationalities and faiths, and we will support them vigorously.

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