News

Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by Bennett McIntosh for the Office of the Dean for Research
Cities. They sprawl and tangle, juxtaposing ancient public squares and glistening skyscrapers. They provide homes for half of humanity, and economic and cultural centers for the rest. It has taken us thousands of years to build today's urban centers, and yet, they're expected to double in land-area in just the next few decades. Though this growth is inevitable, the way these cities will expand is not. Rather than repeat the sprawling and uncoordinated development patterns of the past, researchers like Bou-Zeid and others in Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science are exploring new ways to build urban infrastructures to serve our growing population, changing civilization and warming planet.
Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by Gwen McNamara, PACE Communications Coordinator
From creating documentary films in Dallas, Texas to building health and wellness curricula for youth in Charlottesville, VA to supporting programs for previously incarcerated men and women in Los Angeles, CA, 17 first-year students are making service – in all its broad forms – an integral part of their learning at Princeton University as 2017 Bogle Fellows. One of these students is June Philippe of Irvington, NJ who is assisting HS students in Newark with the college application process. She says “as a first-generation student, I’ve noted that a lot of the information that is necessary to a successful college experience is often passed down from those who attended college in their personal networks, however for low-income and first-generation students these resources are not made readily. I’d like to change this narrative in favor of the marginalized.”
Thursday, Mar 9, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
The start of Donald Trump’s presidency has been anything but predictable. So far, his first 100 days in office have been filled with a lot of heat, noise — and executive orders. But is this that abnormal? Or is it par for the course? Where do we draw the line between what is unprecedented, and what we’ve seen before? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss these questions — which are based on a recent article in The Upshot, a column for The New York Times— in episode #34 of Politics & Polls.
Wednesday, Mar 8, 2017
by Rochelle Hendricks, NJ Secretary of Higher Education
Historically, New Jersey has led the nation in providing a richly diverse student population with many pathways to gain access to life-changing, high-quality higher education. For nearly 50 years, the Educational Opportunity Fund (EOF) program has helped thousands of students from the lowest income levels in the State achieve their dreams.
Thursday, Mar 2, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Donald Trump has signed an executive order to withdraw from the negotiating process of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and has vowed to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement. Both moves signal to foreign nations that the United States may have a very different outlook on international trade under President Trump. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview (Ret.) Amb. Michael B.G. Froman ’85 about his outlook for international trade in a ‘Trumpian World.’
Wednesday, Mar 1, 2017
by Office of the Dean for Research
The universe has come into sharper focus with the release this week of new images from the one of the largest telescopes in the world. A multinational collaboration led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan that includes Princeton University scientists has published a “cosmic census” of a large swath of the night sky containing roughly 100 million stars and galaxies, including some of the most distant objects in the universe. These high-quality images allow an unprecedented view into the nature and evolution of galaxies and dark matter.
Wednesday, Mar 1, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
An influx of pollution from Asia in the western United States and more frequent heat waves in the eastern U.S. are responsible for the persistence of smog in these regions over the past quarter century despite laws curtailing the emission of smog-forming chemicals from automobile tailpipes and factories. The study, led by researchers at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), highlights the importance of maintaining domestic emission controls on cars, power plants and other industries at a time when pollution is increasingly global.
Tuesday, Feb 28, 2017
by Michael Hotchkiss, Office of Communications
As part of Princeton University's ongoing efforts to increase diversity and inclusion, three academic departments have created pilot programs that build bridges between undergraduate coursework and doctoral programs for promising young scholars from underrepresented backgrounds. The pilot programs in astrophysical sciences, physics and politics offer a select number of recent bachelor's degree graduates the opportunity to spend between one and two years on campus taking courses and conducting research. The goals of the non-degree programs are to help the scholars gain admission to top-tier doctoral programs and to help diversify their fields on campus and beyond. Brandon Johnson is one student who came to the bridge program in the Department of Politics in January 2016 after finishing his bachelor's degree in political science from Monmouth University in West Long Branch, New Jersey.
Monday, Feb 27, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Early this year, about 30 neuroscientists and computer programmers got together to improve their ability to read the human mind. The hackathon was one of several that researchers from Princeton University and Intel, the largest maker of computer processors, organized to build software that can tell what a person is thinking in real time, while the person is thinking it. The collaboration between researchers at Princeton and Intel has enabled rapid progress on the ability to decode digital brain data, scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to reveal how neural activity gives rise to learning, memory and other cognitive functions.
Monday, Feb 27, 2017
by Maura M. Fennessy
This issue of @princeton.edu features the work of the University, as a research institution and convener of experts in their fields, to address global policy issues that challenge our nation and those around the world. In this issue, we place particular emphasis on diversity, climate change and digital privacy.

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