News

Monday, Aug 7, 2017
by David Brown
On Tuesday, August 1, the Pace Center for Civic Engagement welcomed the Rev. Karen Hernandez-Granzen as its first Community Partner-in-Residence. From August through October 2017, Pastor Karen will work with the Pace Center to strengthen the intersection of the wider campus and community.
Friday, Aug 4, 2017
by Jon Wallace
Researchers have had trouble explaining why black children are much more likely than other children to suffer from asthma. A new study by Princeton University strongly suggests that much of the answer lies in persistent residential segregation, which traps minority children in unhealthy, polluted neighborhoods.
Wednesday, Aug 2, 2017
By learning about the world, students are better prepared to help find ways to improve it, to play active role in creating a just, peaceful, inclusive and sustainable future. Students entering the marketplace today are finding that making a living does not have to conflict with being a good global citizen.
Tuesday, Aug 1, 2017
by Office of Communications
If climate change is not curbed, increased precipitation could substantially overload waterways in the United States with excess nitrogen, according to a new study published July 28 in the journal Science. A team of researchers, including those from Princeton University, reported that climate change-induced precipitation changes will increase nitrogen pollution, especially in the Midwest and Northeast. This will, in turn, worsen eutrophication, a process by which waterways become overloaded with nutrients.
Tuesday, Aug 1, 2017
by William Leventon
The hardest thing about concrete just might be the problem of how to make the ubiquitous building material in an environmentally friendly manner. Recent laboratory results at Princeton University indicate that the challenge of making greener concrete may eventually be cracked. Concrete raises climate-change concerns because manufacturing its primary component, Portland cement, is responsible for as much as 8 percent of human carbon dioxide emissions. Even worse from an environmental standpoint, forecasters predict Portland cement production will double over the next 30 years.
Thursday, Jul 27, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly
Drawing connections between the past and present often sparks fierce debates within the American political landscape. In this episode, Eric Foner, one of America’s most distinguished historians, discusses these interpretations of history and how they relate to today. His latest book, “Battles for Freedom,” explores this “use and abuse of American history,” unearthing the hidden history of American radicalism.
Thursday, Jul 20, 2017
by Woodrow Wilson School
The Civil Rights Movement is often looked back upon as a time when social activism sparked real political change. During that time, the United States saw some of its greatest leaders guide the country through turbulent years. Martin Luther King Jr. and President John F. Kennedy provided different models of leadership, which some argue are needed today. In this episode, Professor Julian Zelizer interviews Steven Levingston, nonfiction editor at the Washington Post, about the battle over civil rights. Levingston is the author of "Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights", “Little Demon in the City of Light: A True Story of Murder and Mesmerism in Belle Époque Paris” and “The Kennedy Baby: The Loss that Transformed JFK.”
Wednesday, Jul 19, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani
Dogs’ ability to communicate and interact with humans is one the most astonishing differences between them and their wild cousins, wolves. A new study published today in the journal Science Advances identifies genetic changes that are linked to dogs’ human-directed social behaviors and suggests there is a common underlying genetic basis for hyper-social behavior in both dogs and humans.
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella for the Office of the Dean for Research
Researchers used computer modeling to show how cells can feel their way through their surroundings, important when, for example, a tumor cell invades a new tissue or organ. This computer simulation depicts collagen fibers that make up the extracellular matrix in which cells live. Local arrangements of these fibers are extremely variable in their flexibility, with some fibers (blue) responding strongly to the cell and others (red) responding hardly at all. The surprising amount of variability in a local area makes it difficult for cells (represented by green arrows) to determine the overall amount of stiffness in a local area, and suggests that cells need to move or change shape to sample more of the surrounding area.
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by Susan DeSantis for the Office of Engineering Communications
George Luchak, a professor of civil engineering emeritus who taught at Princeton for two decades, died June 6 at his Princeton home. He was 97. Luchak specialized in analyzing technical innovations, including the module that landed men on the moon in 1969. Luchak, who joined the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in 1966, was the first to teach operations research, which uses mathematical modeling to analyze complex situations such as risk analysis, climate study and traffic management.

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