News

Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Rising seas are making flooding more common in coastal areas around the country. Now, a new collaborative study by researchers at Princeton and Rutgers universities finds that sea-level rise will boost the occurrence of moderate rather than severe flooding in some regions of the United States, while in other areas the reverse is true. The study found that along the southeastern coast, where severe flooding due to hurricanes is relatively frequent, cities such as Charleston, South Carolina, will see a disproportionate increase in moderate flooding. However, areas that have little history of severe flooding, such as Seattle, are likely to experience a greater uptick in the number of severe, or even historically unprecedented, floods. The study, published June 7 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, looked at how climate-driven sea-level rise is likely to amplify coastal flooding — which already costs municipalities along the East and Gulf coasts $27 billion annually — over the next 50 to 100 years.
Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Race remains a potent political force in America, as evidenced by the 2016 presidential election. Despite the progress that’s been made, race continues to infiltrate many areas of public policy from health care to education to employment. Professor Eddie Glaude from Princeton University joins this episode of Politics & Polls to discuss current race relations in America. Glaude, chair of the Center for African American Studies and William S. Todd Professor of Religion and African Studies at Princeton.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
A group of Princeton University faculty and students experienced the burgeoning wind-power sector in person on May 3 during a visit to the Sherbino Mesa II Wind Farm in Ft. Stockton, Texas. Owned by BP, the wind farm consists of 58 operating wind turbines with a total power-generating peak capacity of 145 megawatts. Support for the trip was provided by the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. The Princeton visitors sought to understand the technical and financial aspects of wind power and to search for research projects that would be valuable to the industry. The wind-power industry, globally and in the United States, is several times larger than the solar-power industry, and both have been growing rapidly over the past decade.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
Scientists have developed a new method to forecast the extent of sea ice in some regions of the Arctic up to 11 months in advance. The method, which incorporates information about ocean temperatures and focuses on regions rather than the entire Arctic Sea, could help in the planning of activities ranging from shipping to oil and gas extraction, fishing and tourism.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
Protected natural areas are the surest way to ensure the survival of the increasing number of plant and animal species that face habitat loss and extinction. Yet, worldwide many of these sanctuaries suffer from inadequate funding, maintenance, enforcement and public support. Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas.
Thursday, Jun 1, 2017
by Josephine Wolff, Office of Engineering Communications
A team of Princeton researchers has developed a method to detect and defend against attacks on the Tor system, which provides anonymity to internet users. Tor was designed in the early 2000s to make it more difficult to trace what people are doing online by routing their traffic through a series of “proxy” servers before it reaches its final destination. This makes it difficult to track Tor users because their connections to a particular server first pass through intermediate Tor servers called relays. But while Tor can be a powerful tool to help protect users’ privacy and anonymity online, it is not perfect.
Thursday, Jun 1, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Donald Trump’s attacks on the media persist while journalists continue to grapple with how to cover such a tumultuous presidency. Amidst the clamor, new voices in journalism have risen to the top, positioning themselves as political power players in a media-saturated world. Among these voices is Lauren Duca, an award-winning journalist at Teen Vogue. In December 2016, Duca penned an essay, “Donald Trump is Gaslighting America,” which argued that Trump relies on deceit to undermine the truth so his critics question their own judgment. The essay quickly went viral, generating more than one million views to date. Duca joins this episode of Politics & Polls to discuss her essay, her work at Teen Vogue and the future of journalism under the Trump administration.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Can foreign aid promote political and economic stability in nations receiving support? Are there certain underlying conditions that make it easier (or harder) for developing countries to adopt stabilizing reforms? A new book by Ethan Kapstein, visiting professor at the Woodrow Wilson School, examines this, tracing the United States’ use of land reform as a vehicle for producing political stability in pro-Western countries.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
President Donald Trump recently returned from an international trip, with stops in Saudi Arabia, Israel and Palestine, where he met with top officials and visited sacred spaces. The Woodrow Wilson School discussed Trump’s Middle East visit — and what it means symbolically and politically — with Amb. (Ret.) Daniel C. Kurtzer, lecturer and S. Daniel Abraham Professor in Middle East Policy Studies. Kurtzer served as U.S. ambassador to Egypt from 1997 to 2001 and as U.S. ambassador to Israel from 2001 to 2005.
Tuesday, May 30, 2017
by Sharon B. Adarlo, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
Transportation experts predict that many commuters will pass up typical vehicles and instead hop into fully-automated, driverless cars to get to their destination in the near future. Autonomous vehicles will rule the roadways by the middle of this century, according to recent news articles. They are also predicted to reshape our cities, decrease automobile crashes, cut down congestion, and, of course, disrupt several industries, from private parking lots to car insurance. Engineers at various companies, such as Google and Fiat Chrysler, are hard at work perfecting their own version of the fully-automated driverless vehicle. A few of the sensing technologies that will enable driverless vehicles – self-park steering and lane correction – have already made it into some vehicles on the market today. In the latest “The Andlinger Center Speaks,” Professor Alain Kornhauser at ORFE is interviewed about the environmental implications of these smart, driverless vehicles that are poised to transform our lives. Kornhauser, a pioneering researcher in automated transportation and an expert in automotive engineering systems, recently held a summit on this emerging sector this month.

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