Research

Wednesday, Mar 15, 2017
by Bennett McIntosh for the Office of the Dean for Research
Cities. They sprawl and tangle, juxtaposing ancient public squares and glistening skyscrapers. They provide homes for half of humanity, and economic and cultural centers for the rest. It has taken us thousands of years to build today's urban centers, and yet, they're expected to double in land-area in just the next few decades. Though this growth is inevitable, the way these cities will expand is not. Rather than repeat the sprawling and uncoordinated development patterns of the past, researchers like Bou-Zeid and others in Princeton's School of Engineering and Applied Science are exploring new ways to build urban infrastructures to serve our growing population, changing civilization and warming planet.
Thursday, Mar 9, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
The start of Donald Trump’s presidency has been anything but predictable. So far, his first 100 days in office have been filled with a lot of heat, noise — and executive orders. But is this that abnormal? Or is it par for the course? Where do we draw the line between what is unprecedented, and what we’ve seen before? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss these questions — which are based on a recent article in The Upshot, a column for The New York Times— in episode #34 of Politics & Polls.
Thursday, Mar 2, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Donald Trump has signed an executive order to withdraw from the negotiating process of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and has vowed to renegotiate the North American Free Trade Agreement. Both moves signal to foreign nations that the United States may have a very different outlook on international trade under President Trump. In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview (Ret.) Amb. Michael B.G. Froman ’85 about his outlook for international trade in a ‘Trumpian World.’
Wednesday, Mar 1, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
An influx of pollution from Asia in the western United States and more frequent heat waves in the eastern U.S. are responsible for the persistence of smog in these regions over the past quarter century despite laws curtailing the emission of smog-forming chemicals from automobile tailpipes and factories. The study, led by researchers at Princeton University and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL), highlights the importance of maintaining domestic emission controls on cars, power plants and other industries at a time when pollution is increasingly global.
Wednesday, Mar 1, 2017
by Office of the Dean for Research
The universe has come into sharper focus with the release this week of new images from the one of the largest telescopes in the world. A multinational collaboration led by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan that includes Princeton University scientists has published a “cosmic census” of a large swath of the night sky containing roughly 100 million stars and galaxies, including some of the most distant objects in the universe. These high-quality images allow an unprecedented view into the nature and evolution of galaxies and dark matter.
Monday, Feb 27, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Early this year, about 30 neuroscientists and computer programmers got together to improve their ability to read the human mind. The hackathon was one of several that researchers from Princeton University and Intel, the largest maker of computer processors, organized to build software that can tell what a person is thinking in real time, while the person is thinking it. The collaboration between researchers at Princeton and Intel has enabled rapid progress on the ability to decode digital brain data, scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to reveal how neural activity gives rise to learning, memory and other cognitive functions.
Thursday, Feb 23, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Almost every U.S. president has struggled to broker peace agreements in the Middle East, especially among Israel and Palestine. For many, the possibility of a peace agreement seems dire, with a two-state solution that seems to be fleeting. But what can we expect to see from President Donald Trump? To unravel these complex issues, Amb. Daniel Kurtzer joins this episode of Politics & Polls with co-hosts Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Three projects with the potential for broad impacts in science and technology have been selected to receive support from the Eric and Wendy Schmidt Transformative Technology Fund. The projects include a technology for improving ultrasound's grainy images, a system for boosting biofuel production, and a facility for designing and testing new wind power technologies.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Office of Communications
For decades, among the most enduring questions for ecologists have been: "Why do species live where they do? And what are the factors that keep them there?" A Princeton University-based study featured on the February cover of the journal Ecology could prove significant in answering that question, particularly for animals in the world's temperate mountain areas. If species are bound to where they live by temperature, they are going to be much more controlled by temperature moving forward than we may have thought. Where they live in the future will likely directly track local temperature changes resulting from global climate change.
Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017
by Wendy Plump, Office of Engineering Communications
Robert Pagels had three minutes to pitch his team's new method to cram several months' worth of medicine into a single injection at the Keller Center’s 12th annual Innovation Forum on Feb. 15. "We like to describe it as a cluster of grapes," said Pagels, a graduate student in chemical and biological engineering who collaborated with fellow student Chester Markwalter. "Each nanoparticle is a grape with its own skin, and we're clustering them together into microparticles. Microparticles are small enough where they can still fit through a needle, but big enough that you can really load a lot of drug." Pagels and Markwalter took the top prize at the Innovation Forum, an event for University researchers to present potentially marketable discoveries, with their technology to package multiple doses of medicine into microscopically small particles for controlled release in a patient.

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