Research

Wednesday, Jun 28, 2017
by The Office of Communications
Princeton University neuroscientist Sabine Kastner comes prepared for a meeting with her youngest collaborators, packing a model of the human brain, a collection of preserved animal brains and a video demonstrating a single neuron in action. Those collaborators — fifth-graders at Riverside School in Princeton, shown in the video above — are prepared, too, with questions, ideas and enthusiasm.
Tuesday, Jun 27, 2017
by Julie Halsey, Princeton Entrepreneurship Council
Last month, the Princeton Entrepreneurship Council (PEC), in partnership with Princeton University Press, held a TigerTalks in the City on “Breakthrough Books,” featuring four Princeton faculty members discussing their most recent books, all published by PUP, in New York City. The quarterly series is designed to bring Princeton research to New York. The faculty participating in the evening’s panel discussion are all Princeton University Press authors: Sir Angus Deaton, the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professor of International Affairs, Emeritus; Nancy Malkiel, professor of history, emeritus; Dalton Conley, the Henry Putnam University Professor in Sociology; and Alexander Todorov, professor of psychology.
Thursday, Jun 15, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
One of the ongoing challenges in American politics is appealing to younger demographics - not simply through elections and voter turn-out but engaging young people with the political process. Today’s young people - and even some adults – find politics difficult to digest and unappealing, presenting challenges in the ways that Americans learn, interpret and analyze politics. Gabe Fleisher, a 15-year-old student in St. Louis, is looking to change that with his newsletter “Wake Up to Politics,” which is sent to 36,000 readers every morning. Our youngest guest to date, Fleshier discusses his newsletter and how to make politics appealing in this episode of Politics & Polls.
Thursday, Jun 15, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
The premise of "The Environmental Nexus,” a class which debuted in the spring semester at Princeton, is that the undergraduates of today will be left to deal with the future effects of the global environmental crisis, particularly climate change, the loss of biodiversity, and food and water shortages. These calamities are expected to peak around 2050 when the first-year students of 2017 are around 50 years old. Because every facet of the students’ lives will be touched by the environmental crisis, the unique structure of “Environmental Nexus” approaches the topic from distinct perspectives represented by the four Princeton faculty who co-teach the course.
Thursday, Jun 15, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs
Sir Angus Deaton testified June 8 before the U.S. Senate’s Joint Economic Committee on the economic aspects of the opioid epidemic. In his testimony, Deaton provided an overview of the study he published in 2015 with Anne Case, which was the first to detect a rise in all-cause mortality driven by deaths from drugs, alcohol and suicide among middle-aged Americans, especially those without a college degree. These “deaths of despair” — defined as suicides, deaths from alcoholic liver disease and deaths from illegal and legal drug overdoses — cannot be explained by the Great Recession or current unemployment rates, Deaton told committee members. Instead, the deaths are a response to prolonged economic conditions, social dysfunction and a loss of meaning in the interconnected worlds of work and family.
Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella, Office of the Dean for Research
Rising seas are making flooding more common in coastal areas around the country. Now, a new collaborative study by researchers at Princeton and Rutgers universities finds that sea-level rise will boost the occurrence of moderate rather than severe flooding in some regions of the United States, while in other areas the reverse is true. The study found that along the southeastern coast, where severe flooding due to hurricanes is relatively frequent, cities such as Charleston, South Carolina, will see a disproportionate increase in moderate flooding. However, areas that have little history of severe flooding, such as Seattle, are likely to experience a greater uptick in the number of severe, or even historically unprecedented, floods. The study, published June 7 in the journal Environmental Research Letters, looked at how climate-driven sea-level rise is likely to amplify coastal flooding — which already costs municipalities along the East and Gulf coasts $27 billion annually — over the next 50 to 100 years.
Thursday, Jun 8, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Race remains a potent political force in America, as evidenced by the 2016 presidential election. Despite the progress that’s been made, race continues to infiltrate many areas of public policy from health care to education to employment. Professor Eddie Glaude from Princeton University joins this episode of Politics & Polls to discuss current race relations in America. Glaude, chair of the Center for African American Studies and William S. Todd Professor of Religion and African Studies at Princeton.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
A group of Princeton University faculty and students experienced the burgeoning wind-power sector in person on May 3 during a visit to the Sherbino Mesa II Wind Farm in Ft. Stockton, Texas. Owned by BP, the wind farm consists of 58 operating wind turbines with a total power-generating peak capacity of 145 megawatts. Support for the trip was provided by the Princeton Environmental Institute and the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment. The Princeton visitors sought to understand the technical and financial aspects of wind power and to search for research projects that would be valuable to the industry. The wind-power industry, globally and in the United States, is several times larger than the solar-power industry, and both have been growing rapidly over the past decade.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
Scientists have developed a new method to forecast the extent of sea ice in some regions of the Arctic up to 11 months in advance. The method, which incorporates information about ocean temperatures and focuses on regions rather than the entire Arctic Sea, could help in the planning of activities ranging from shipping to oil and gas extraction, fishing and tourism.
Friday, Jun 2, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
Protected natural areas are the surest way to ensure the survival of the increasing number of plant and animal species that face habitat loss and extinction. Yet, worldwide many of these sanctuaries suffer from inadequate funding, maintenance, enforcement and public support. Robert Pringle, a Princeton University assistant professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, advocates in a June 1 perspective piece in the journal Nature for a global effort to upgrade and enlarge protected areas.

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