News

Tuesday, Jan 10, 2017
by Susan Promislo, Office of Communications
Princeton University has a substantial impact on the New Jersey economy, generating an annual total of $1.58 billion in economic output as an employer, research and innovation leader, sponsor of construction projects, purchaser of goods and services, and financial and civic contributor to local communities. That total supports an estimated 13,450 jobs with $970.7 million in earnings. The economic and other benefits the University generates within the town of Princeton and neighboring communities, Mercer County and the state of New Jersey are presented in a new report, "Education, Innovation and Opportunity: The Economic Impact of Princeton University."
Friday, May 19, 2017
by Pooja Makhijani, Office of Communications
New evidence suggests that a nutrient that is both essential to life and an environmental scourge when present in large quantities is increasing in the open ocean, according to a new study published May 19 in the journal Science. The increase of this nutrient, known as “fixed” nitrogen, was studied in coral. The findings give researchers new insight into ocean ecosystems, which in turn provides a greater understanding for scientists and policymakers on how they should prioritize human-made threats to Earth’s biosphere and climate.
Thursday, May 18, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
Washington has been hit with a trifecta of catastrophic events in the past week. First, President Donald Trump fired Federal Bureau of Investigation Director James Comey, justifying his decision by pointing toward Comey’s mishandling of the investigation of Hillary Clinton’s emails. Trump later changed course, admitting he fired Comey for continuing the investigation about Russia’s role in disrupting the 2016 election. Just days later, news broke that Trump shared classified information about the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) with Russian diplomats in the Oval Office — a decision defended by Trump and Lt. Gen. H. R. McMaster, Trump’s national security advisor. Now, Comey has returned to the spotlight following media reports that he wrote a memo about a conversation in which Trump told him to end the Michael Flynn investigation. How have the dramatic events of this week changed Washington? What’s next in the ongoing saga of the Trump presidency? Is an investigation or impeachment possible? Professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang discuss this and more in episode #44 of Politics and Polls.
Monday, May 15, 2017
by Morgan Kelly, Princeton Environmental Institute
James Baker, the 61st U.S. Secretary of State, a 1952 graduate of Princeton and former trustee, gave the Taplin Lecture, “A Conservative Approach to Climate Change,” at McCosh Hall yesterday. He presented a plan he developed with several prominent Republicans to garner conservative support for curbing carbon emissions and curtailing the effects of climate change.
Friday, May 12, 2017
by Jeanne Laymon, Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students
Eight students have been named winners of the 2017 Spirit of Princeton Award, honoring Princeton University undergraduates for positive contributions to campus life, three of these winners are from NJ. The award recognizes those who have demonstrated a strong commitment to the undergraduate experience through dedicated efforts in student organizations, athletics, community service, religious life, residential life and the arts. This year's winners were selected from a group of over 80 nominees and were honored with a certificate and book prize during a dinner on May 10. The Spirit of Princeton Award is sponsored by the Office of the Dean of Undergraduate Students and has been given annually since 1995.
Thursday, May 11, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
President Donald Trump pledged to bring jobs back to America during his campaign, appealing to a strong middle class base that’s been struggling with stagnant wages and few job opportunities. Since the 1990s, death rates among this demographic — specifically middle-aged white Americans without college degrees — have been on the rise thanks to opioid addiction, alcohol abuse and suicide. This same pattern isn’t seen in other parts of the world, reversing decades of progress. Economist Anne Case, whose landmark study with co-author Sir Angus Deaton first detected the rise in mortality rates, joins this episode to discuss why “deaths of despair” are plaguing middle-aged white Americans.
Wednesday, May 10, 2017
by Sharon B. Adarlo, Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment
NRG Energy, the leading integrated power company in the U.S, has joined Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership, an initiative that forges research collaborations between practitioners outside academia and experts across Princeton University to pursue transformational innovations in the fields of energy and the environment. The company, whose retail electricity providers serve almost 3 million residential and commercial customers throughout the country, is headquartered in Princeton, New Jersey and Houston, Texas. Founded in 2011 as an initiative of the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment, Princeton E-ffiliates Partnership fosters research collaboration, works to swiftly move high-impact research from lab to market, and facilitates technology transfer between Princeton and its members. Other E-ffiliates members include ExxonMobil, PSEG, and Power Survey Company.
Monday, May 8, 2017
by John Sullivan, Office of Engineering Communications
The same technology that adds fizz to soda can now be used to remove particles from dirty water. Researchers at Princeton University have found a technique for using carbon dioxide in a low-cost water treatment system that eliminates the need for costly and complex filters. The system injects CO2 gas into a stream of water as a method of filtering out particles. The gas, which mixes with the water in a system of channels, temporarily changes the water's chemistry. The chemical changes cause the contaminating particles to move to one side of the channel depending on their electrical charge. By taking advantage of this migration, the researchers are able to split the water stream and filter out suspended particles.
Thursday, May 4, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
In his campaign promise to make America great again, President Donald Trump vowed to “bring jobs back to America” and revitalize the labor industry. Now, one hundred days into the Trump presidency, some are wondering: Where are all of those jobs? Believers say job creation is right around the corner, while critics argue little has been done, as Trump has mostly focused on rhetoric instead of policy. In an effort to untangle such labor issues, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview Christopher P. Lu '88, former U.S. Deputy Secretary of Labor. In this episode, Lu provides an inside look at the Department of Labor as well as the Trump transition.
Friday, Apr 28, 2017
by Julian Zelizer & Sam Wang
The first 100 days of Trump’s presidency have been a whirlwind of victories and setbacks, leaving Americans with mixed opinions about President Trump and how the next four years could unfold. While his approval ratings are at historic lows and he has yet to enact any major legislation, his supporters have been pleased with the burst of executive actions and his defiant stand against the political establishment. How has President Trump done in his first 100 days, and how does he compare to past presidents? Why is the first 100 days in office used as a barometer in the first place? Do these presidential beginnings predict the course of an entire term? In this episode of Politics & Polls, professors Julian Zelizer and Sam Wang interview political historian Meg Jacobs, a research scholar at Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs. Jacobs explains the concept of evaluating a president’s first 100 days and how she thinks Trump’s faring from a historical perspective.

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