News

Tuesday, Jan 10, 2017
by Susan Promislo, Office of Communications
Princeton University has a substantial impact on the New Jersey economy, generating an annual total of $1.58 billion in economic output as an employer, research and innovation leader, sponsor of construction projects, purchaser of goods and services, and financial and civic contributor to local communities. That total supports an estimated 13,450 jobs with $970.7 million in earnings. The economic and other benefits the University generates within the town of Princeton and neighboring communities, Mercer County and the state of New Jersey are presented in a new report, "Education, Innovation and Opportunity: The Economic Impact of Princeton University."
Thursday, Jul 20, 2017
by Woodrow Wilson School
The Civil Rights Movement is often looked back upon as a time when social activism sparked real political change. During that time, the United States saw some of its greatest leaders guide the country through turbulent years. Martin Luther King Jr. and President John F. Kennedy provided different models of leadership, which some argue are needed today. In this episode, Professor Julian Zelizer interviews Steven Levingston, nonfiction editor at the Washington Post, about the battle over civil rights. Levingston is the author of "Kennedy and King: The President, the Pastor, and the Battle over Civil Rights", “Little Demon in the City of Light: A True Story of Murder and Mesmerism in Belle Époque Paris” and “The Kennedy Baby: The Loss that Transformed JFK.”
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by Catherine Zandonella for the Office of the Dean for Research
Researchers used computer modeling to show how cells can feel their way through their surroundings, important when, for example, a tumor cell invades a new tissue or organ. This computer simulation depicts collagen fibers that make up the extracellular matrix in which cells live. Local arrangements of these fibers are extremely variable in their flexibility, with some fibers (blue) responding strongly to the cell and others (red) responding hardly at all. The surprising amount of variability in a local area makes it difficult for cells (represented by green arrows) to determine the overall amount of stiffness in a local area, and suggests that cells need to move or change shape to sample more of the surrounding area.
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by Susan DeSantis for the Office of Engineering Communications
George Luchak, a professor of civil engineering emeritus who taught at Princeton for two decades, died June 6 at his Princeton home. He was 97. Luchak specialized in analyzing technical innovations, including the module that landed men on the moon in 1969. Luchak, who joined the faculty of the School of Engineering and Applied Science in 1966, was the first to teach operations research, which uses mathematical modeling to analyze complex situations such as risk analysis, climate study and traffic management.
Tuesday, Jul 18, 2017
by The Office of Communications
Peter Grant, the Class of 1877 Professor of Zoology, Emeritus, and professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, emeritus, and B. Rosemary Grant, senior research biologist, emeritus, ecology and evolutionary biology, have been named recipients of the Royal Medal in Biology. The Grants’ legendary explorations of the group of 18 bird species known as Darwin’s finches that populate the Galápagos island of Daphne Major — which is in an entirely natural state unaffected by humans — over four decades have produced an array of dazzling insights into evolutionary theory.
Thursday, Jul 13, 2017
by Kristin Qian
Jo Dunkley, a professor of physics and astrophysical sciences who joined the faculty last year, asks big questions about the universe and the fundamental laws that describe nature. She is also a mentor to women in science. Dunkley, who had her second child this spring, said she feels it is part of her job to “figure out how to have a family, be a mother, and be a professor.”
Thursday, Jul 13, 2017
by B. Rose Kelly
President Donald Trump has spent his first months faced with a potential scandal involving Russia, an issue that’s only grown since the election with discussions and investigations about possible obstruction and collusion. In recent weeks, this has dominated national political debates, especially in Congress and the White House. Benjamin Wittes, co-founder and editor-in-chief of the Lawfare blog, joins this episode of Politics & Polls to discuss where things stand in the Trump-Russia story. The Lawfare blog is “devoted to sober and serious discussion of ‘hard national security choices.’”
Wednesday, Jul 12, 2017
by Suleman Din for the Office of Engineering Communications
Finding an alternative vehicle fuel poses a difficult challenge: it has to be relatively cheap and able to reduce carbon emissions without using up valuable crop land or trees from forests. Now, researchers at Princeton’s Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment say one possible solution might be all around us. In a recent paper, the researchers evaluated a method that creates fuel from wood residues, sawdust and branches. The method, called catalytic hydropyrolysis, could use the refining and distribution systems now used for gasoline to create a fuel that would work in modern engines.
Wednesday, Jul 5, 2017
by Jamie Saxon
Zachary Beecher is a captain on the 2nd Brigade Combat Team’s staff working for the brigade commander in developing the analysis for the ongoing advise-and-assist mission in Iraq. For the first six months of his deployment, Beecher served as the logistics advise-and-assist coordinator for 2nd Brigade, 82nd Airborne Division. With his team of logistics advisers, he coordinated efforts with coalition partners including Sweden, New Zealand, Great Britain, Australia, Hungary, Norway, Germany, France and others while working hand-in-hand with the Iraqi Army to provide support and real-time consultations on optimizing logistics operations in support of the five Iraqi Army Divisions (nearly 100,000 Iraqi soldiers) engaged in combat operations to liberate Mosul, Iraq.
Thursday, Jun 29, 2017
by The Office of Communications
The 2016-17 academic year at Princeton University has been memorable, with high points ranging from a faculty member’s Nobel Prize to the valedictorian’s commitment to service and community. Throughout the year, the University strengthened its commitments to academic excellence through research and teaching; increased access and inclusion across ability, race, gender and income; reflected on and expanded our service mission; made changes to the campus environment; supported vibrant student experiences; and gathered for major events.

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